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Acculturation, education, and gender roles: evidence from Canada
[Gender differences in educational attainment among the children of Canadian immigrants]

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  • Anke S KesslerBy
  • Kevin Milligan

Abstract

This article studies the influence of cultural norms on economic outcomes. We combine detailed information on second-generation female immigrants with historical data from their ancestral source countries to see how the cultural endowment affects current decisions on work and fertility. We show that results using the standard approach are somewhat sensitive to context and specification. We then extend to reveal an education gradient for cultural assimilation: lower-educated women exhibit a strong influence of cultural variables while higher-educated women show no influence at all. We gather and present evidence on several potential mechanisms for the education gradient.

Suggested Citation

  • Anke S KesslerBy & Kevin Milligan, 2021. "Acculturation, education, and gender roles: evidence from Canada [Gender differences in educational attainment among the children of Canadian immigrants]," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(2), pages 509-533.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:73:y:2021:i:2:p:509-533.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpaa032
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    Cited by:

    1. Markowsky, Eva, 2022. "Culture, Female Labour Force Participation, and Selective Migrationː New Meta-Analytic Evidence," WiSo-HH Working Paper Series 65, University of Hamburg, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences, WISO Research Laboratory.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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