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Acculturation, Education, and Gender Roles: Evidence from Canada

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  • Kessler, Anke
  • Milligan, Kevin

Abstract

This paper studies the influence of cultural norms on economic outcomes. We combine detailed information on second-generation female immigrants with historical data from their ancestral source country to see how the cultural endowment received from their fathers affects current decisions. Our results show that education plays a critical role in cultural transmission: lower-educated women exhibit a strong influence of cultural variables while higher-educated women show no influence at all.

Suggested Citation

  • Kessler, Anke & Milligan, Kevin, 2017. "Acculturation, Education, and Gender Roles: Evidence from Canada," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168299, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc17:168299
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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