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Culture: Persistence and Evolution

  • Francesco Giavazzi
  • Ivan Petkov
  • Fabio Schiantarelli

This paper documents the speed of evolution (or lack thereof) of a range of values and beliefs of different generations of US immigrants, and interprets the evidence in the light of a model of socialization and identity choice. Convergence to the norm differs greatly across cultural attitudes. Moreover, results obtained studying higher generation immigrants differ from those found when the analysis is limited to the second generation and imply a lesser degree of persistence than previously thought. Persistence is also culture specific, in the sense that the country of origin of one's ancestors matters for the pattern of generational convergence.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 20174.

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Date of creation: May 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:20174
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