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Gender roles and medical progress

Author

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  • Albanesi, Stefania

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Olivetti, Claudia

Abstract

Maternal mortality was the second-leading cause of death for women in childbearing years up until the mid-1930s in the United States. For each death, twenty times as many mothers were estimated to suffer pregnancy-related conditions, often leading to severe and prolonged disablement. Poor maternal health made it particularly hard for mothers to engage in market work. Between 1930 and 1960, there was a remarkable reduction in maternal mortality and morbidity, thanks to medical advances. We argue that these medical advances, by enabling women to reconcile work and motherhood, were essential for the joint rise in married women’s labor force participation and fertility over this period. We also show that the diffusion of infant formula played an important auxiliary role.

Suggested Citation

  • Albanesi, Stefania & Olivetti, Claudia, 2015. "Gender roles and medical progress," Staff Reports 720, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:720
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    maternal health; labor force participation;

    JEL classification:

    • I00 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General - - - General
    • J00 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - General
    • J19 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Other
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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