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Household appliances and the use of time: the United States and Britain since the 1920s

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  • SUE BOWDEN
  • AVNER OFFER

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  • Sue Bowden & Avner Offer, 1994. "Household appliances and the use of time: the United States and Britain since the 1920s," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 47(4), pages 725-748, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:47:y:1994:i:4:p:725-748
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1468-0289.1994.tb01399.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Fouquet, Roger, 2012. "Trends in income and price elasticities of transport demand (1850–2010)," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 62-71.
    2. Stefania Albanesi & Claudia Olivetti, 2006. "Gender roles and technological progress," 2006 Meeting Papers 411, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Stefania Albanesi & Claudia Olivetti, 2016. "Gender Roles and Medical Progress," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 124(3), pages 650-695.
    4. Foellmi, Reto & Wuergler, Tobias & Zweimüller, Josef, 2014. "The macroeconomics of Model T," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 617-647.
    5. Avner Offer, 1998. "Epidemics of Abundance: Overeating and Slimming in the USA and Britain since the 1950s," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _025, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    6. Martha J. Bailey & William J. Collins, 2011. "Did Improvements in Household Technology Cause the Baby Boom? Evidence from Electrification, Appliance Diffusion, and the Amish," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 189-217, April.
    7. Avner Offer, 1998. "Epidemics of Abundance: Overeating and Slimming in the USA and Britain since the 1950s," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _025, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    8. Chih-Chien Huang & Scott Yabiku & Jennie Kronenfeld, 2015. "The Effects of Household Technology on Body Mass Index among Chinese Adults," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 34(6), pages 877-899, December.
    9. Peter Scott, 2009. "Mr Drage, Mr Everyman, and the creation of a mass market for domestic furniture in interwar Britain -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 62(4), pages 802-827, November.
    10. Bakker, Gerben, 2004. "At the origins of increased productivity growth in services. Productivity, social savings and the consumer surplus of the film industry, 1900-1938," Economic History Working Papers 22348, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    11. Avner Offer, 2008. "British Manual Workers: From Producers to Consumers, c. 1950-2000," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _074, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    12. Madureira, Nuno Luís, 2010. "The European debate on rate systems in the interwar period," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 4703-4711, August.
    13. Bakker, Gerben, 2007. "Structural change and the growth contribution of services: how motion pictures industrialized US spectator entertainment," Economic History Working Papers 22314, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    14. Weiss, Martin & Patel, Martin K. & Junginger, Martin & Blok, Kornelis, 2010. "Analyzing price and efficiency dynamics of large appliances with the experience curve approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 770-783, February.
    15. Svensson, Lars, 2008. "Technology, institutions and allocation of time in Swedish households 1920-1990," Working Paper Series 2008:20, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    16. Deepa Chandrasekaran & Gerard J. Tellis, 2008. "Global Takeoff of New Products: Culture, Wealth, or Vanishing Differences?," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 27(5), pages 844-860, 09-10.
    17. Choi, David Y. & Stack, Martin H., 2005. "The all-American beer: a case of inferior standard (taste) prevailing?," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 79-86.
    18. Avner Offer, 2008. "British Manual Workers: From Producers to Consumers, c. 1950–2000," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _074, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    19. Cheng Chen & Shin-Yi Chou & Robert J. Thornton, 2015. "The Effect of Household Technology on Weight and Health Outcomes among Chinese Adults: Evidence from China's "Home Appliances Going to the Countryside" Policy," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(3), pages 364-401.

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