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In Search of Homo Economicus: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small- Scale Societies

Author

Listed:
  • Ernst Fehr

    (University of Zuerich)

  • Joseph Henrich

    (University of Michigan)

  • Robert Boyd

    (University of California, Los Angeles)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Ernst Fehr & Joseph Henrich & Robert Boyd, 2003. "In Search of Homo Economicus: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small- Scale Societies," Microeconomics 0305009, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpmi:0305009
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 6
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    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/mic/papers/0305/0305009.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ernst Fehr & Simon Gächter, 2000. "Fairness and Retaliation: The Economics of Reciprocity," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 159-181, Summer.
    2. Roth, Alvin E. & Vesna Prasnikar & Masahiro Okuno-Fujiwara & Shmuel Zamir, 1991. "Bargaining and Market Behavior in Jerusalem, Ljubljana, Pittsburgh, and Tokyo: An Experimental Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1068-1095, December.
    3. Joseph Henrich & Robert Boyd & Samuel Bowles & Colin Camerer & Ernst Fehr & Herbert Gintis & Richard McElreath, 2001. "Cooperation, Reciprocity and Punishment in Fifteen Small-scale Societies," Working Papers 01-01-007, Santa Fe Institute.
    4. Ernst Fehr & Simon Gächter, 2000. "Fairness and Retaliation," International Economic Association Series, in: L.-A. Gérard-Varet & S.-C. Kolm & J. Mercier Ythier (ed.), The Economics of Reciprocity, Giving and Altruism, chapter 7, pages 153-173, Palgrave Macmillan.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Homo Economicus; Behavioral Experiments; Small-Scale Societies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D00 - Microeconomics - - General - - - General
    • J00 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

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