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Work Environment and Individual Background: Explaining Regional Shirking Differentials in a Large Italian Firm

  • Andrea Ichino
  • Giovanni Maggi

The prevalence of shirking within a large Italian bank appears to be characterized by significant regional differentials. In particular, absenteeism and misconduct episodes are substantially more prevalent in the south. We consider a number of potential explanations for this fact: different individual backgrounds; group-interaction effects; sorting of workers across regions; differences in local attributes; different hiring policies and discrimination against southern workers. Our analysis suggests that individual backgrounds, group-interaction effects and sorting effects contribute to explain the north-south shirking differential. None of the other explanations appears to be of first-order importance.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w7415.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 7415.

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Date of creation: Nov 1999
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Publication status: published as Ichino, Andrea and Giovanni Maggi. "Work Environment And Individual Background: Explaining Regional Shirking Differentials In A Large Italian Firm," Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2000, v115(3,Aug), 1057-1090.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7415
Note: LS
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