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Cultural Values And Decision To Work Of Immigrant Women In Italy

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  • Vincenzo Scoppa

    ()

  • Manuela Stranges

    () (Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza, Università della Calabria)

Abstract

We investigate the role of culture in explaining economic outcomes at individual level analyzing how cultural values from the home country affect the decision to work of immigrants in Italy, using the National Survey of Households with Immigrants. Following the “epidemiological approach”, we relate the probability of being employed in Italy for immigrant women with the female labor force participation (LFP) in their country of origin, taken as a proxy of cultural heritage and gender role model. Controlling for a number of individual and household characteristics, we show that participation in the labor market is affected both by the culture of females’ and by their husband’s origin countries. We also show that the relationship between own decisions in the host country and home country LFP cannot be attributed to human capital quality or discrimination and it turns out to be stronger for immigrants that maintained more intense ties with their origin countries. Finally, we investigate to what extent cultural influence is driven by religious beliefs: we find that religion is a key determinant of differences in female labor decisions, but, besides religion, other cultural values exert additional influence..

Suggested Citation

  • Vincenzo Scoppa & Manuela Stranges, 2014. "Cultural Values And Decision To Work Of Immigrant Women In Italy," Working Papers 201413, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza "Giovanni Anania" - DESF.
  • Handle: RePEc:clb:wpaper:201413
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Maria De Paola & Rosetta Lombarso & Valeria Pupo & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2020. "Do Women Shy Away From Public Speaking? A Field Experiment," Working Papers 202001 Classification-JEL, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza "Giovanni Anania" - DESF.
    2. Akyol, Pelin & Okten, Cagla, 2019. "The Role of Culture on Female Labor Supply: Evidence from Turkey," IZA Discussion Papers 12620, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Culture; Immigration; Labor Force Participation; Epidemiological Approach; Gender; Italy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General

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