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Are Married Women in Turkey More Likely to Become Added or Discouraged Workers?

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  • Cem Başlevent
  • Özlem Onaran

Abstract

. The purpose of this study is to examine the labour market outcomes of married couples to find out which of the added and discouraged worker effects is dominant in urban Turkish families. Using household labour force survey and province‐level data from 1988 and 1994, we look for evidence regarding the dependency of the labour force participation decisions of wives and the employment status of their husbands. On yearly and pooled samples of married couples in their prime ages, bivariate probit estimates indicate that the two decisions are negatively correlated. However, the correlation is found to be statistically significant only in the economic crisis year of 1994. We interpret this finding to mean that the added worker effect dominates the discouraged worker effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Cem Başlevent & Özlem Onaran, 2003. "Are Married Women in Turkey More Likely to Become Added or Discouraged Workers?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 17(3), pages 439-458, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:17:y:2003:i:3:p:439-458
    DOI: 10.1111/1467-9914.00248
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Clarence D. Long, 1958. "The Labor Force under Changing Income and Employment," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number long58-1.
    2. Lundberg, Shelly, 1985. "The Added Worker Effect," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 11-37, January.
    3. Maloney, Tim, 1991. "Unobserved Variables and the Elusive Added Worker Effect," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 58(230), pages 173-187, May.
    4. James J. Heckman & Thomas MaCurdy, 1982. "Corrigendum on A Life Cycle Model of Female Labour Supply," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(4), pages 659-660.
    5. Nilüfer Çağatay & Günseli Berik, 1990. "Transition to Export-Led Growth in Turkey: Is There a Feminization of Employment?," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 22(1), pages 115-134, March.
    6. James J. Heckman & Thomas E. Macurdy, 1980. "A Life Cycle Model of Female Labour Supply," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 47-74.
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