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Working Women Worldwide. Age Effects in Female Labor Force Participation in 117 Countries

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  • Besamusca, Janna
  • Tijdens, Kea
  • Keune, Maarten
  • Steinmetz, Stephanie

Abstract

In this article, we investigate the effects of economic conditions, families, education, and gender ideologies on the labor force participation rates of women in eleven age groups in 117 countries. We find that participation rates of young and older women are partly explained by sector sizes and the level of economic development. However, to explain the labor force participation rates of women between 25 and 55 years, we need to study families and gender ideologies. We find these women are more likely to participate when paid maternity leave schemes exist, enrollment in pre-primary education is higher, and countries are less religious.

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  • Besamusca, Janna & Tijdens, Kea & Keune, Maarten & Steinmetz, Stephanie, 2015. "Working Women Worldwide. Age Effects in Female Labor Force Participation in 117 Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 123-141.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:74:y:2015:i:c:p:123-141
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2015.04.015
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