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Women's employment decisions in Malaysia: Does religion matter?

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  • Amin, Shahina
  • Alam, Imam

Abstract

Religion may influence female employment decisions because different religions specify different life styles. This study investigates whether religion is a significant determinant of married and single women's paid-work and full-time employment in Malaysia. Using the Second Malaysian Family Life Survey and a sequential logit approach, this paper finds that religion is less influential in urban areas than in rural areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Amin, Shahina & Alam, Imam, 2008. "Women's employment decisions in Malaysia: Does religion matter?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2368-2379, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:37:y:2008:i:6:p:2368-2379
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. KIZILCA, F. Kemal, 2013. "Booze and women: Gendering labor market outcomes of secular consumption patterns in a Muslim society," MPRA Paper 51832, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Merle Kreibaum & Stephan Klasen, 2015. "Missing Men: Differential Effects of War and Socialism on Female Labour Force Participation in Vietnam," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 181, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    3. Fischer, Justina AV & Aydıner-Avşar, Nursel, 2015. "Are women in the MENA region really that different from women in Europe? Globalization, conservative values and female labor market participation," MPRA Paper 63800, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Besamusca, Janna & Tijdens, Kea & Keune, Maarten & Steinmetz, Stephanie, 2015. "Working Women Worldwide. Age Effects in Female Labor Force Participation in 117 Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 123-141.
    5. Lou O'Neil, Mary & Bilgin, Mehmet Huseyin & Lau, Chi Keung Marco, 2012. "The Effects of Religious Beliefs on the Working Decisions of Women: Some Evidence from Turkey," MPRA Paper 46973, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Dunn, Richard A. & Tan, Andrew K.G., 2010. "Cervical cancer screening in Malaysia: Are targeted interventions necessary?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(6), pages 1089-1093, September.

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