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The Effects of Religious Beliefs on the Working Decisions of Women: Some Evidence from Turkey

  • Lou O'Neil, Mary
  • Bilgin, Mehmet Huseyin
  • Lau, Chi Keung Marco

This paper examines the decision of Turkish women to participate in the labor force. We administered a original survey questionnaire in 2009 to 518 non-working women. Employing logistic regression, we found that religious belief is a crucial factor that discourages women from participating in the labor market. In particular, the regular performance of religious rituals have the greatest negative effect on labor market participation for educated women, who are the most productive human resource in the economy.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/46973/1/MPRA_paper_46973.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 46973.

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Date of creation: 10 Feb 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:46973
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  1. Marcus Noland, 2003. "Religion, Culture, and Economic Performance," Working Paper Series WP03-8, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  2. Meltem Ince, 2009. "A Socio-Economic Perspective on Women Entrepreneurs: Evidence from Turkey," Economic Studies journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 4, pages 138-166.
  3. Aysit Tansel, 2001. "Economic Development and Female Labor Force Participation in Turkey: Time-Series Evidence and Cross-Province Estimates," ERC Working Papers 0105, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised May 2001.
  4. Cem Baslevent & Ozlem Onaran, 2003. "Are Married Women in Turkey More Likely to Become Added or Discouraged Workers?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 17(3), pages 439-458, 09.
  5. McCleary, Rachel & Barro, Robert, 2003. "Religion and Economic Growth across Countries," Scholarly Articles 3708464, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  6. Esa Mangeloja, 2003. "Implications of the Economics of Religion to the Empirical Economic Research," Others 0310004, EconWPA.
  7. Amin, Shahina & Alam, Imam, 2008. "Women's employment decisions in Malaysia: Does religion matter?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2368-2379, December.
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