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Does having children affect women’s entrepreneurship decision? Evidence from Nigeria

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  • Joseph Boniface Ajefu

    (University of the Witwatersrand)

Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of fertility on women’s entrepreneurship decision in Nigeria, using the 2008 and 2013 cross-sectional Demographic Health Surveys data. In order to mitigate the potential endogeneity associated with fertility decision, the study explores an exogenous variation in family size using twin births in an instrumental variable (IV) analysis. Both the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) and Two-Stage Least Squares (2SLS) estimate show that having children is positively associated with women’s entrepreneurship decision, and there are heterogeneous effects across the subsamples by women’s age. The results of this study are robust to using the number of children younger than age five in the home as an alternative definition of fertility.

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph Boniface Ajefu, 2019. "Does having children affect women’s entrepreneurship decision? Evidence from Nigeria," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 843-860, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:17:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s11150-019-09453-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-019-09453-2
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    Cited by:

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    2. Öberg, Stefan, 2018. "Instrumental variables based on twin births are by definition not valid (v.3.0)," SocArXiv zux9s, Center for Open Science.
    3. Tiwari, Chhavi & Goli, Srinivas & Rammohan, Anu, 2021. "Reproductive Burden And Its Impact On Female Labour Market Outcomes In India: Evidence From Longitudinal Analyses," SocArXiv nhjvm, Center for Open Science.

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