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Home-Based Work and Women's Labor Force Decisions

Author

Listed:
  • Linda N. Edwards

    (The Graduate Center, City University of New York)

  • Elizabeth Field-Hendrey

    (Queens College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York)

Abstract

Home-based work differs from other employment because the work site is the home itself. This difference means that the fixed costs of working at home are less than the fixed costs of working on site and that home-based workers may engage in joint market and household production. Using data from the 1990 Census, we find that home-based work is an attractive option for women for whom the fixed costs of work are highwomen who have small children, are disabled, or live in rural areasand that home-based workers are more likely to choose self-employment than are on-site workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Linda N. Edwards & Elizabeth Field-Hendrey, 2002. "Home-Based Work and Women's Labor Force Decisions," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(1), pages 170-200, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:20:y:2002:i:1:p:170-169
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blanchflower, David G & Oswald, Andrew J, 1998. "What Makes an Entrepreneur?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 26-60, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Florian Noseleit, 2014. "The impact of childcare enrollment on women’s selection into self-employment," Working Papers 2014/15, Maastricht School of Management.
    2. Roche, Kristen, 2013. "Reconciling gender differences in the returns to education in self-employment: Does occupation matter?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 112-119.
    3. Anastasia Semykina, 2016. "Self-Employment among Women: Do Children Matter More Than We Previously Thought?," Working Papers wp2016_07_02, Department of Economics, Florida State University.
    4. Lynn A. Karoly & Julie Zissimopoulos, 2004. "Self-Employment Trends and Patterns Among Older U.S. Workers," Working Papers WR-136, RAND Corporation.
    5. Keith A. Bender & Kristen Roche, 2016. "Self-employment and the paradox of the contented female worker," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 421-435, August.
    6. Marcus T. Wolfe & Pankaj C. Patel, 2017. "Instant gratification: temporal discounting and self-employment," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 861-882, April.
    7. Mendola, Mariapia & Carletto, Calogero, 2012. "Migration and gender differences in the home labour market: Evidence from Albania," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 870-880.
    8. Fernanda Llussa, 2011. "Determinants of Entrepreneurship: Are Women Different?," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp555, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    9. Nadia Simoes & Nuno Crespo & Sandrina B. Moreira, 2016. "Individual Determinants Of Self-Employment Entry: What Do We Really Know?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(4), pages 783-806, September.
    10. Florian Noseleit, 2014. "Female self-employment and children," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 549-569, October.
    11. Wellington, Alison J., 2006. "Self-employment: the new solution for balancing family and career?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 357-386, June.
    12. Aaronson, Daniel & Dehejia, Rajeev & Jordon, Andrew & Pop-Eleches, Cristian & Samii, Cyrus & Schultze, Karl, 2017. "The Effect of Fertility on Mothers’ Labor Supply over the Last Two Centuries," MPRA Paper 76768, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Domínguez V., Lilia & Brown, Flor, 2013. "Gender differences in workplace choices under crisis conditions," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), December.
    14. Pinka Chatterji & Sara Markowitz, 2008. "Family Leave after Childbirth and the Health of New Mothers," NBER Working Papers 14156, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Velamuri, Malathi, 2009. "Taxes, Health Insurance and Women’s Self-Employment," MPRA Paper 15731, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Scott Adams & John Heywood & Laurie Miller, 2014. "Caregivers, firm policies and gender discrimination claims," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 359-377, June.
    17. Marco Caliendo & Steffen Künn, 2015. "Getting back into the labor market: the effects of start-up subsidies for unemployed females," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 1005-1043, October.
    18. Bojnec, Stefan & Dries, Liesbeth & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2003. "Human Capital And Labor Flows Out Of The Agricultural Sector: Evidence From Slovenia," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25803, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    19. Radek Szulga, 2014. "A Dynamic Model of Female Labor Force Participation Rate and Human Capital Investment," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 39(3), pages 81-114, September.
    20. Marcus T. Wolfe & Pankaj C. Patel, 2016. "Grit and self-employment: a multi-country study," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 47(4), pages 853-874, December.
    21. repec:kap:sbusec:v:48:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11187-016-9793-y is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Philipp Koellinger & Maria Minniti & Christian Schade, 2008. "Seeing the World with Different Eyes," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-035/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 11 Mar 2011.
    23. Peter Zwan & Ingrid Verheul & A. Thurik, 2012. "The entrepreneurial ladder, gender, and regional development," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 627-643, October.

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