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Female self-employment and children

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  • Florian Noseleit

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Abstract

Several analyses report a positive correlation between fertility and female self-employment; however, scholars disagree about the direction of this relationship. Knowing about the causal relationship is important because the relevant mechanisms and possible implications differ tremendously. This paper studies two competing hypotheses: Is self-employment more attractive to women because they have children? Or, is it occupation-specific characteristics of self-employed women that impact their fertility? This work applies a unique approach by utilizing exogenous variation in both children and self-employment. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Florian Noseleit, 2014. "Female self-employment and children," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 549-569, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:sbusec:v:43:y:2014:i:3:p:549-569
    DOI: 10.1007/s11187-014-9570-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:sbusec:v:50:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11187-017-9887-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Florian Noseleit, 2014. "The impact of childcare enrollment on women’s selection into self-employment," Working Papers 2014/15, Maastricht School of Management.
    3. Pernilla Andersson Joona, 2017. "Are mothers of young children more likely to be self-employed? The case of Sweden," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 307-333, March.
    4. Silke Tegtmeier & Agnieszka Kurczewska & Jantje Halberstadt, 2016. "Are women graduates jacquelines-of-all-trades? Challenging Lazear’s view on entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 47(1), pages 77-94, June.
    5. repec:kap:sbusec:v:49:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11187-017-9840-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:kap:empiri:v:44:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10663-016-9332-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Jessica K. Simon & Megan McDonald Way, 2016. "Why the Gap? Determinants of Self-Employment Earnings Differentials for Male and Female Millennials in the US," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 297-312, June.
    8. repec:kap:sbusec:v:51:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11187-017-9925-z is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Suprinovič, Olga & Schneck, Stefan & Kay, Rosemarie, 2015. "Family-related employment interruptions and self-employment of women: Does policy matter?," Working Papers 03/15, Institut für Mittelstandsforschung (IfM) Bonn.
    10. repec:kap:sbusec:v:48:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11187-016-9793-y is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Carlianne Patrick & Heather Stephens & Amanda Weinstein, 2016. "Where are all the self-employed women? Push and pull factors influencing female labor market decisions," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 365-390, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Self-employment; Causality; Gender; Female entrepreneurship; Children; L26; M13; J13;

    JEL classification:

    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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