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Fertility and mothers' labor supply: new evidence using time-to-conception

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  • Claudia Hupkau
  • Marion Leturcq

Abstract

We analyze the impact of children on their mothers' labor market outcomes in the UK. We use time-to-conception of the first child as an exogenous variation in the probability of having more children. We find that having more children decreases the propensity to work in long part-time jobs but does not reduce participation for high- and intermediate-skilled mothers. For low skilled women, the impact on participation is large and negative. We show that the selection into having a second child is positive for for low-skilled mothers and negative for high-skilled and intermediate-skilled mothers. Women most attached to the labor market are also those that tend to have only one child among high- and intermediate-skilled women. The reverse is true for low-skilled women: those least attached to the labor market are also less likely to have a second child. This appears to be driven by unobserved attributes that negatively affect both labor market outcomes and the likelihood to remain in a relationship with the father of the first child, which in turn negatively affects the probability to have a second child.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudia Hupkau & Marion Leturcq, 2017. "Fertility and mothers' labor supply: new evidence using time-to-conception," CEP Discussion Papers dp1463, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1463
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor force supply of women; infertility shocks; time-to-conception; causal impact;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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