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(Non)persistent effects of fertility on female labour supply

  • Rondinelli, Concetta
  • Zizza, Roberta

The negative association between fertility and female labour supply is complicated by the endogeneity of fertility. We address this problem by using an exogenous variation in family size caused by infertility shocks, related to the fact that nature prevents some women from achieving their desired fertility levels. Despite a widely-documented reduction of female labour supply around childbirth, using the SHIW we find that this effect dissipates over time, with some signs of penalties relating to job quality and careers. Results are confirmed by exploiting the Birth Survey, with insights of a different impact according to the age of the child.

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Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 2011-04.

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Date of creation: 20 Jan 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2011-04
Contact details of provider: Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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  16. Jorge M. Aguero & Mindy S. Marks, 2008. "Motherhood and Female Labor Force Participation: Evidence from Infertility Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 500-504, May.
  17. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1980. "Testing the Quantity-Quality Fertility Model: The Use of Twins as a Natural Experiment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 227-40, January.
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