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The Effect of a First Child on Female Labor Supply: Evidence from Women Seeking Fertility Services: Working Paper 2006-11

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  • Julian P. Cristia

Abstract

Estimating the causal effect of a first child on female labor supply is complicated by the endogeneity of the fertility decision. That is, factors that trigger the decision to have a first child could also affect baseline labor supply; empirical approaches that do not account for this difficulty will yield biased estimates. This paper addresses this problem by focusing on a sample of women from the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) who sought help to get pregnant. After a certain period, only some of these women gave birth to a child. In this instance, fertility appears to be exogenous

Suggested Citation

  • Julian P. Cristia, 2006. "The Effect of a First Child on Female Labor Supply: Evidence from Women Seeking Fertility Services: Working Paper 2006-11," Working Papers 18233, Congressional Budget Office.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbo:wpaper:18233
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    File URL: https://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/109th-congress-2005-2006/workingpaper/2006-11_0.pdf
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