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Julian Cristia

Personal Details

First Name:Julian
Middle Name:
Last Name:Cristia
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pcr97

Affiliation

Inter-American Development Bank

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.iadb.org/

: 202-623-1000

1300 New York Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20577
RePEc:edi:iadbbus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters Books

Working papers

  1. Paulo Bastos & Julian Cristia & Beomsoo Kim, 2016. "Good schools or good students? Evidence on school effects from universal random assignment of students to high schools," Discussion Paper Series 1607, Institute of Economic Research, Korea University.
  2. Matías Busso & Julian P. Cristia & Sarah D. Humpage, 2015. "Did You Get Your Shots? Experimental Evidence on the Role of Reminders," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6944, Inter-American Development Bank.
  3. Matias Busso & Julian Cristia & Sarah Humpage, 2015. "Did You Get Your Shots? Experimental Evidence on the Role of Reminders (Journal Article)," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 55d36a7a72ab4463887e27e19, Mathematica Policy Research.
  4. German Bet & Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarraran, 2014. "The Effects of Shared School Technology Access on Students’ Digital Skills in Peru," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-476, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  5. Julian Cristia & Alejo Czerwonko & Pablo Garofalo, 2014. "Does Technology in Schools Affect Repetition, Dropout and Enrollment? Evidence from Peru," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-477, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  6. Julian P. Cristia & William N. Evans & Beomsoo Kim, 2012. "Improving the Health Coverage of the Rural Poor:Does Contracting Out Medical Mobile Teams Work?," Discussion Paper Series 1203, Institute of Economic Research, Korea University.
  7. Paulo Bastos & Nicolas Bottan & Julian Cristia, 2012. "Access to Preprimary Education and Progression in Primary School: Evidence from Rural Guatemala," Research Department Publications 4815, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  8. Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarraran & Santiago Cueto & Ana Santiago & Eugenio Severin, 2012. "Technology and Child Development: Evidence from the One Laptop per Child Program," Research Department Publications 4764, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  9. Diether Beuermann & Julian Cristia & Yyannu Cruz-Aguayo & Santiago Cueto & Ofer Malamud, 2012. "Home Computers and Child Outcomes: Short-Term Impacts from a Randomized Experiment in Peru," Research Department Publications 4813, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  10. Julian Cristia & William Evans & Beomsoo Kim, 2011. "Does Contracting-Out Primary Care Services Work? The Case of Rural Guatemala," Research Department Publications 4728, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  11. Paulo Bastos & Lucio Castro & Julian Cristia & Carlos Scartascini, 2011. "Does Energy Consumption Respond to Price Shocks? Evidence from a Regression-Discontinuity Design," Research Department Publications 4702, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  12. Paulo Bastos & Julian Cristia, 2010. "Entry and Quality Choices in Child Care Markets," Research Department Publications 4696, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  13. Julian Cristia & Alejo Czerwonko & Pablo Garofalo, 2010. "Does ICT Increase Years of Education? Evidence from Peru," OVE Working Papers 0110, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
  14. Julian Cristia, 2009. "Rising Mortality and Life Expectancy Differentials by Lifetime Earnings in the United States," Research Department Publications 4607, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  15. Julian P. Cristia, 2007. "The Empirical Relationship Between Lifetime Earnings and Mortality: Working Paper 2007-11," Working Papers 19096, Congressional Budget Office.
  16. Julian Cristia & Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2007. "Measurement Error in the SIPP: Evidence from Matched Administrative Records: Working Paper 2007-03," Working Papers 18322, Congressional Budget Office.
  17. Julian P. Cristia, 2006. "The Effect of a First Child on Female Labor Supply: Evidence from Women Seeking Fertility Services: Working Paper 2006-11," Working Papers 18233, Congressional Budget Office.

Articles

  1. Paulo Bastos & Nicolas L. Bottan & Julian Cristia, 2017. "Access to Preprimary Education and Progression in Primary School: Evidence from Rural Guatemala," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(3), pages 521-547.
  2. Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarrarán & Santiago Cueto & Ana Santiago & Eugenio Severín, 2017. "Technology and Child Development: Evidence from the One Laptop per Child Program," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 295-320, July.
  3. Julian Cristia & William N. Evans & Beomsoo Kim, 2015. "Improving the Health Coverage of the Rural Poor: Does Contracting-Out Mobile Medical Teams Work?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(3), pages 247-261, March.
  4. Diether W. Beuermann & Julian Cristia & Santiago Cueto & Ofer Malamud & Yyannu Cruz-Aguayo, 2015. "One Laptop per Child at Home: Short-Term Impacts from a Randomized Experiment in Peru," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 53-80, April.
  5. Paulo Bastos & Lucio Castro & Julian Cristia & Carlos Scartascini, 2015. "Does Energy Consumption Respond to Price Shocks? Evidence from a Regression-Discontinuity Design," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(2), pages 249-278, June.
  6. Cristia, Julian & Prado, Ariadna García & Peluffo, Cecilia, 2015. "The Impact of Contracting in and Contracting out Basic Health Services: The Guatemalan Experience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 215-227.
  7. Busso, Matias & Cristia, Julian & Humpage, Sarah, 2015. "Did you get your shots? Experimental evidence on the role of reminders," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 226-237.
  8. Julian Cristia & Alejo Czerwonko & Pablo Garofalo, 2014. "Does technology in schools affect repetition, dropout and enrollment? Evidence from Peru," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 17, pages 89-112, May.
  9. Bastos, Paulo & Cristia, Julian, 2012. "Supply and quality choices in private child care markets: Evidence from São Paulo," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 242-255.
  10. Cristia, Julian P., 2009. "Rising mortality and life expectancy differentials by lifetime earnings in the United States," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 984-995, September.
  11. Julian P. Cristia, 2008. "The Effect of a First Child on Female Labor Supply: Evidence from Women Seeking Fertility Services," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(3), pages 487-510.

Chapters

  1. Matías Busso & Julián Cristia & Diana Hincapié & Julián Messina & Laura Ripani, 2017. "Learning Better for an Uncertain Future," IDB Publications (Book Chapters),in: Matías Busso & Julián Cristia & Diana Hincapié & Julián Messina & Laura Ripani (ed.), Learning Better: Public Policy for Skills Development, edition 1, chapter 1, pages 1-18 Inter-American Development Bank.
  2. María Victoria Barone & Julián Cristia & Santiago Cueto, 2017. "What Counts for Skills Development," IDB Publications (Book Chapters),in: Matías Busso & Julián Cristia & Diana Hincapié & Julián Messina & Laura Ripani (ed.), Learning Better: Public Policy for Skills Development, edition 1, chapter 2, pages 19-43 Inter-American Development Bank.
  3. Matías Busso & Julián Cristia, 2017. "For Better Skills Policies: Turn on the Light," IDB Publications (Book Chapters),in: Matí­as Busso & Julián Cristia & Diana Hincapié & Julián Messina & Laura Ripani (ed.), Learning Better: Public Policy for Skills Development, edition 1, chapter 5, pages 99-120 Inter-American Development Bank.
  4. Julián Cristia, 2017. "Improving Skills in Childhood: A Cost-Effective Approach," IDB Publications (Book Chapters),in: Matí­as Busso & Julián Cristia & Diana Hincapié & Julián Messina & Laura Ripani (ed.), Learning Better: Public Policy for Skills Development, edition 1, chapter 7, pages 145-171 Inter-American Development Bank.
  5. Edna Armendáriz & Martín Ardanaz & Julián Cristia & Diana Hincapié, 2015. "More Bang for the Buck: Investing in Early Childhood Development," IDB Publications (Book Chapters),in: Samuel Berlinski & Norbert Schady (ed.), The Early Years: Child Well-Being and the Role of Public Policy, edition 1, chapter 6, pages 149-178 Inter-American Development Bank.

Books

  1. María Caridad Araujo & Martín Ardanaz & Edna Armendáriz & Jere R. Behrman & Samuel Berlinski & Julian P. Cristia & Luca Flabbi & Diana Hincapie & Analía Jalmovich & Sharon Lynn Kagan & Florencia López, 2015. "The Early Years: Child Well-being and the Role of Public Policy," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 7259 edited by Samuel Berlinski & Norbert Schady, September.
  2. Matías Busso & Julian P. Cristia & Diana Hincapie & Julián Messina & Laura Ripani, . "Learning Better: Public Policy for Skills Development," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 8495, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Matías Busso & Julian P. Cristia & Sarah D. Humpage, 2015. "Did You Get Your Shots? Experimental Evidence on the Role of Reminders," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6944, Inter-American Development Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Busso, Matias & Romero, Dario & Salcedo, Dario, 2017. "Improving access to preventive maternal health care using reminders: Experimental evidence from Guatemala," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 43-46.

  2. Matias Busso & Julian Cristia & Sarah Humpage, 2015. "Did You Get Your Shots? Experimental Evidence on the Role of Reminders (Journal Article)," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 55d36a7a72ab4463887e27e19, Mathematica Policy Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Busso, Matias & Romero, Dario & Salcedo, Dario, 2017. "Improving access to preventive maternal health care using reminders: Experimental evidence from Guatemala," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 43-46.

  3. German Bet & Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarraran, 2014. "The Effects of Shared School Technology Access on Students’ Digital Skills in Peru," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-476, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Bulman, George & Fairlie, Robert W., 2015. "Technology and Education: Computers, Software, and the Internet," IZA Discussion Papers 9432, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Sally Murray, 2017. "New technologies create opportunities," WIDER Working Paper Series 156, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  4. Julian Cristia & Alejo Czerwonko & Pablo Garofalo, 2014. "Does Technology in Schools Affect Repetition, Dropout and Enrollment? Evidence from Peru," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-477, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Bulman, George & Fairlie, Robert W., 2015. "Technology and Education: Computers, Software, and the Internet," IZA Discussion Papers 9432, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. German Bet & Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarraran, 2014. "The Effects of Shared School Technology Access on Students’ Digital Skills in Peru," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-476, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    3. Clair Null & Clemencia Cosentino & Swetha Sridharan & Laura Meyer, "undated". "Policies and Programs to Improve Secondary Education in Developing Countries: A Review of the Evidence," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 516e420e637c4851b15e6a3f6, Mathematica Policy Research.

  5. Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarraran & Santiago Cueto & Ana Santiago & Eugenio Severin, 2012. "Technology and Child Development: Evidence from the One Laptop per Child Program," Research Department Publications 4764, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Bruce Wydick & Paul Glewwe & Laine Rutledge, 2017. "Does Child Sponsorship Pay off in Adulthood? An International Study of Impacts on Income and Wealth," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(2), pages 434-458.
    2. De Melo, Gioia & Machado, Alina & Miranda, Alfonso, 2014. "The Impact of a One Laptop per Child Program on Learning: Evidence from Uruguay," IZA Discussion Papers 8489, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Falck, Oliver & Mang, Constantin & Woessmann, Ludger, 2015. "Virtually No Effect? Different Uses of Classroom Computers and their Effect on Student Achievement," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 223, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    4. Julian Cristia & Alejo Czerwonko & Pablo Garofalo, 2014. "Does Technology in Schools Affect Repetition, Dropout and Enrollment? Evidence from Peru," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-477, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    5. Hull, Marie C. & Duch, Katherine, 2017. "One-To-One Technology and Student Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 10886, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Alejandro J. Ganimian & Richard J. Murnane, 2014. "Improving Educational Outcomes in Developing Countries: Lessons from Rigorous Impact Evaluations," NBER Working Papers 20284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Samuel Berlinski & Matías Busso, 2015. "Challenges in Educational Reform: An Experiment on Active Learning in Mathematics," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6825, Inter-American Development Bank.
    8. Diether W. Beuermann & Emma Naslund-Hadley & Inder J. Ruprah & Jennelle Thompson, 2013. "The Pedagogy of Science and Environment: Experimental Evidence from Peru," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(5), pages 719-736, May.
    9. Miguel Urquiola, 2015. "Progress and challenges in achieving an evidence-based education policy in Latin America and the Caribbean," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 24(1), pages 1-30, December.
    10. Patrizia Faustini & Dorothea Kleine & Sammia Poveda & David Hollow, 2014. "Children, ICT and Development: Capturing the potential, meeting the challenges," Papers innins715, Innocenti Insights.
    11. Facundo Albornoz & María Victoria Anauati & Melina Furman & Mariana Luzuriaga & María Eugenia Podestá & Inés Taylor, 2017. "Training to teach science: experimental evidence from Argentina," Discussion Papers 2017-08, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    12. Sarojini Hirshleifer, 2017. "Incentives for Effort or Outputs? A Field Experiment to Improve Student Performance," Working Papers 201701, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
    13. Muralidharan, K. & Singh, A. & Ganimian, A. J., 2016. "Disrupting education? Experimental evidence on technology-aided instruction in India," Working Paper 467377, Harvard University OpenScholar.
    14. Bekkerman, Anton & Gilpin, Gregory, 2013. "High-speed Internet growth and the demand for locally accessible information content," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 1-10.
    15. Diether Beuermann & Julian Cristia & Yyannu Cruz-Aguayo & Santiago Cueto & Ofer Malamud, 2012. "Home Computers and Child Outcomes: Short-Term Impacts from a Randomized Experiment in Peru," Research Department Publications 4813, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    16. Mo, Di & Zhang, Linxiu & Luo, Renfu & Qu, Qinghe & Huang, Weiming & Wang, Jiafu & Qiao, Yajie & Boswell, Matthew & Rozelle, Scott, 2015. "Integrating Computer Assisted Learning into a Regular Curriculum: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Rural Schools in Shaanxi," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212473, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    17. Simona, Comi & Marco, Gui & Federica, Origo & Laura, Pagani & Gianluca, Argentin, 2016. "Is it the way they use it? Teachers, ICT and student achievement," Working Papers 341, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised 10 Jun 2016.
    18. Asim,Salman & Chase,Robert S. & Dar,Amit & Schmillen,Achim Daniel, 2015. "Improving education outcomes in South Asia : findings from a decade of impact evaluations," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7362, The World Bank.
    19. Louis-Philippe Beland & Richard Murphy, 2015. "Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp1350, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    20. Patterson, Richard W. & Patterson, Robert M., 2017. "Computers and productivity: Evidence from laptop use in the college classroom," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 66-79.
    21. Bulman, George & Fairlie, Robert W., 2015. "Technology and Education: Computers, Software, and the Internet," IZA Discussion Papers 9432, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    22. Fairlie, Robert W. & Robinson, Jonathan, 2013. "Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Home Computers on Academic Achievement among Schoolchildren," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt5759k24s, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
    23. German Bet & Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarraran, 2014. "The Effects of Shared School Technology Access on Students’ Digital Skills in Peru," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-476, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    24. Anja Balanskat & Diana Bannister & Benjamin Hertz & Ester Sigilló & Riina Vuorikari, 2013. "Overview and analysis of 1:1 learning initiatives in Europe," JRC Working Papers JRC81903, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    25. Piper, Benjamin & Zuilkowski, Stephanie Simmons & Kwayumba, Dunston & Strigel, Carmen, 2016. "Does technology improve reading outcomes? Comparing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ICT interventions for early grade reading in Kenya," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 204-214.
    26. Diether W. Beuermann & Julian Cristia & Santiago Cueto & Ofer Malamud & Yyannu Cruz-Aguayo, 2015. "One Laptop per Child at Home: Short-Term Impacts from a Randomized Experiment in Peru," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 53-80, April.
    27. María Marta Formichella & María Verónica Alderete & Gisela Amanda Di Meglio, 2015. "El acceso a las TIC en el hogar como determinante del rendimiento educativo en el nivel medio: un análisis para Argentina," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 10,in: Marta Rahona López & Jennifer Graves (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 10, edition 1, volume 10, chapter 18, pages 357-374 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    28. Mo, Di & Swinnen, Johan & Zhang, Linxiu & Yi, Hongmei & Qu, Qinghe & Boswell, Matthew & Rozelle, Scott, 2013. "Can One-to-One Computing Narrow the Digital Divide and the Educational Gap in China? The Case of Beijing Migrant Schools," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 14-29.
    29. Rosangela Bando & Francisco Gallego & Paul Gertler & Dario Romero Fonseca, 2016. "Books or Laptops? The Cost-Effectiveness of Shifting from Printed to Digital Delivery of Educational Content," Documentos de Trabajo 474, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    30. Hernan Galperin & M. Fernanda Viecens, 2017. "Connected for Development? Theory and evidence about the impact of Internet technologies on poverty alleviation," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 35(3), pages 315-336, May.
    31. Tony Read, 2015. "Where Have All the Textbooks Gone?," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 22123, June.

  6. Diether Beuermann & Julian Cristia & Yyannu Cruz-Aguayo & Santiago Cueto & Ofer Malamud, 2012. "Home Computers and Child Outcomes: Short-Term Impacts from a Randomized Experiment in Peru," Research Department Publications 4813, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Deshpande, Ashwini & Desrochers, Alain & Ksoll, Christopher & Shonchoy, Abu S., 2016. "The impact of a computer based adult literacy program on literacy and numeracy : evidence from India," IDE Discussion Papers 551, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    2. Fairlie, Robert, 2015. "Do Boys and Girls Use Computers Differently, and Does It Contribute to Why Boys doWorse in School than Girls?," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt4n54q8xh, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
    3. Alejandro J. Ganimian & Richard J. Murnane, 2014. "Improving Educational Outcomes in Developing Countries: Lessons from Rigorous Impact Evaluations," NBER Working Papers 20284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Bulman, George & Fairlie, Robert W., 2015. "Technology and Education: Computers, Software, and the Internet," IZA Discussion Papers 9432, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. German Bet & Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarraran, 2014. "The Effects of Shared School Technology Access on Students’ Digital Skills in Peru," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-476, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    6. Yamada, Gustavo & Lavado, Pablo & Montenegro, Guadalupe, 2016. "The Effect of One Laptop per Child on Teachers' Pedagogical Practices and Students' Use of Time at Home," IZA Discussion Papers 10432, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Algan, Yann & Fortin, Nicole M., 2016. "Computer Gaming and Test Scores: Cross-Country Gender Differences among Teenagers," IZA Discussion Papers 10433, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  7. Julian Cristia & William Evans & Beomsoo Kim, 2011. "Does Contracting-Out Primary Care Services Work? The Case of Rural Guatemala," Research Department Publications 4728, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Matías Busso & Julian P. Cristia & Sarah D. Humpage, 2015. "Did You Get Your Shots? Experimental Evidence on the Role of Reminders," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 6944, Inter-American Development Bank.
    2. Cristia, Julian & Prado, Ariadna García & Peluffo, Cecilia, 2015. "The Impact of Contracting in and Contracting out Basic Health Services: The Guatemalan Experience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 215-227.

  8. Paulo Bastos & Lucio Castro & Julian Cristia & Carlos Scartascini, 2011. "Does Energy Consumption Respond to Price Shocks? Evidence from a Regression-Discontinuity Design," Research Department Publications 4702, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. W. D. Gregori, 2014. "Fiscal Rules and Public Spending: Evidence from Italian Municipalities," Working Papers wp923, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    2. Gerard, Francois, 2013. "What Changes Energy Consumption, and for How Long? New Evidence from the 2001 Brazilian Electricity Crisis," Discussion Papers dp-13-06, Resources For the Future.

  9. Julian Cristia, 2009. "Rising Mortality and Life Expectancy Differentials by Lifetime Earnings in the United States," Research Department Publications 4607, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.

    Cited by:

    1. Cremer, Helmuth & Roeder, Kerstin, 2016. "Social insurance with competitive insurance markets and risk misperception," IDEI Working Papers 857, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
    2. Marie-Louise Leroux & Pierre Pestieau & Grégory Ponthière, 2015. "Longévité différentielle et redistribution : enjeux théoriques et empiriques," CIRANO Working Papers 2015s-06, CIRANO.
    3. Shantanu Bagchi, 2014. "Labor Supply and the Optimality of Social Security," Working Papers 2014-04, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2014.
    4. Benjamin Ho & Sita N. Slavov, 2012. "An alternative perspective on health inequality," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(4), pages 3182-3196.
    5. Shantanu Bagchi, 2016. "Differential Mortality and the Progressivity of Social Security," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 16-263, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    6. Ali Shourideh & Roozbeh Hosseini, 2016. "Retirement Financing: An Optimal Reform Approach," 2016 Meeting Papers 318, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Cremer, Helmuth & Roeder, Kerstin, 2013. "Long-term care policy, myopia and redistribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 33-43.
    8. Marie-Louise Leroux & Pierre Pestieau & Grégory Ponthière, 2014. "Longévité différentielle et redistribution : enjeux théoriques et empiriques," Working Papers halshs-01071723, HAL.
    9. Christopher Tamborini & ChangHwan Kim & Arthur Sakamoto, 2015. "Education and Lifetime Earnings in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(4), pages 1383-1407, August.
    10. Andrew J.G. Cairns & Malene Kallestrup-Lamb & Carsten P.T. Rosenskjold & David Blake & Kevin Dowd, 2016. "Modelling Socio-Economic Differences in the Mortality of Danish Males Using a New Affluence Index," CREATES Research Papers 2016-14, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    11. Frank N. Caliendo & Aspen Gorry & Sita Slavov, 2017. "Survival Ambiguity and Welfare," NBER Working Papers 23648, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Michele Belloni & Rob Alessie & Adriaan Kalwij & Chiara Marinacci, 2012. "Lifetime income and old age mortality risk in Italy over two decades," CeRP Working Papers 129, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
    13. Geoffrey T. Sanzenbacher & Jorge D. Ramos-Mercado, 2016. "Calculating Expected Social Security Benefits by Race, Education, and Claiming Age," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2016-14, Center for Retirement Research.
    14. Marie-Louise Leroux & Pierre Pestieau & Grégory Ponthière, 2014. "Longévité différentielle et redistribution : enjeux théoriques et empiriques," PSE Working Papers halshs-01071723, HAL.
    15. Monisankar Bishnu & Nick L. Guo & Cagri S Kumru, 2017. "Social Security: Progressive Benefits but Regressive Outcome?," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2017-656, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    16. Roozbeh Hosseini, 2008. "Adverse Selection in the Annuity Market and the Role for Social Security," 2008 Meeting Papers 264, Society for Economic Dynamics.

  10. Julian P. Cristia, 2007. "The Empirical Relationship Between Lifetime Earnings and Mortality: Working Paper 2007-11," Working Papers 19096, Congressional Budget Office.

    Cited by:

    1. Gopi Shah Goda & John B. Shoven & Sita Nataraj Slavov, 2011. "Differential Mortality by Income and Social Security Progressivity," NBER Chapters,in: Explorations in the Economics of Aging, pages 189-204 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. David N. Weil, 2015. "A Review of Angus Deaton's The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(1), pages 102-114, March.
    3. Goda, Gopi Shah & Shoven, John B. & Slavov, Sita Nataraj, 2011. "How Well Are Social Security Recipients Protected From Inflation?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 64(2), pages 429-449, June.
    4. Bahram Sanginabadi, 2017. "Resource Abundance and Life Expectancy," Papers 1801.00369, arXiv.org.
    5. Cocco, João F. & Gomes, Francisco J., 2012. "Longevity risk, retirement savings, and financial innovation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(3), pages 507-529.

  11. Julian Cristia & Jonathan A. Schwabish, 2007. "Measurement Error in the SIPP: Evidence from Matched Administrative Records: Working Paper 2007-03," Working Papers 18322, Congressional Budget Office.

    Cited by:

    1. Dahl, Molly & DeLeire, Thomas & Schwabish, Jonathan, 2009. "Stepping Stone or Dead End? The Effect of the EITC on Earnings Growth," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 62(2), pages 329-346, June.
    2. Richard W. Johnson & Melissa M. Favreault & Corina Mommaerts, 2009. "Work Ability and the Social Insurance Safety Net in the Years Prior to Retirement," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2009-28, Center for Retirement Research, revised Nov 2009.
    3. Molly Dahl & Thomas DeLeire & Jonathan Schwabish & Timothy Smeeding, 2012. "The Earned Income Tax Credit and Expected Social Security Retirement Benefits Among Low-Income Women: Working Paper 2012-06," Working Papers 43033, Congressional Budget Office.

Articles

  1. Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarrarán & Santiago Cueto & Ana Santiago & Eugenio Severín, 2017. "Technology and Child Development: Evidence from the One Laptop per Child Program," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 295-320, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Julian Cristia & William N. Evans & Beomsoo Kim, 2015. "Improving the Health Coverage of the Rural Poor: Does Contracting-Out Mobile Medical Teams Work?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(3), pages 247-261, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Chicoine, Luke & Guzman, Juan Carlos, 2016. "Increasing Rural Health Clinic Utilization with SMS Updates: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Uganda," IZA Discussion Papers 10228, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  3. Diether W. Beuermann & Julian Cristia & Santiago Cueto & Ofer Malamud & Yyannu Cruz-Aguayo, 2015. "One Laptop per Child at Home: Short-Term Impacts from a Randomized Experiment in Peru," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 53-80, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Deshpande, Ashwini & Desrochers, Alain & Ksoll, Christopher & Shonchoy, Abu S., 2016. "The impact of a computer based adult literacy program on literacy and numeracy : evidence from India," IDE Discussion Papers 551, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    2. Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarrarán & Santiago Cueto & Ana Santiago & Eugenio Severín, 2017. "Technology and Child Development: Evidence from the One Laptop per Child Program," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 295-320, July.
    3. Kono, Hisaki & Sawada, Yasuyuki & Shonchoy, Abu S., 2016. "DVD-based distance-learning program for university entrance exams -- RCT experiments in rural Bangladesh," IDE Discussion Papers 580, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    4. Gonzalo Vazquez-Bare, 2017. "Identification and Estimation of Spillover Effects in Randomized Experiments," Papers 1711.02745, arXiv.org, revised May 2018.
    5. Bergman, Peter & Rogers, Todd, 2017. "The Impact of Defaults on Technology Adoption, and Its Underappreciation by Pollicymakers," Working Paper Series rwp17-021, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    6. Figlio, David & Karbownik, Krzysztof & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2015. "Education Research and Administrative Data," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 24/2015, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    7. Muralidharan, K. & Singh, A. & Ganimian, A. J., 2016. "Disrupting education? Experimental evidence on technology-aided instruction in India," Working Paper 467377, Harvard University OpenScholar.
    8. C. Kirabo Jackson & Alexey Makarin, 2016. "Can Online Off-The-Shelf Lessons Improve Student Outcomes? Evidence from A Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 22398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Hisaki Kono & Yasuyuki Sawada & Abu S. Shonchoy, 2016. "DVD-based Distance-learning Program for University Entrance Exams: Experimental Evidence from Rural Bangladesh," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1027, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    10. Peter Leopold S. Bergman, 2016. "Technology Adoption in Education: Usage, Spillovers and Student Achievement," CESifo Working Paper Series 6101, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Robert W. Fairlie & Peter Riley Bahr, 2018. "The Effects of Computers and Acquired Skills on Earnings, Employment and College Enrollment: Evidence from a Fields Experiment and California UI Earnings Records," CESifo Working Paper Series 6860, CESifo Group Munich.
    12. Ava Gail Cas, 2016. "Typhoon Aid and Development: The Effects of Typhoon-Resistant Schools and Instructional Resources on Educational Attainment in the Philippines," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 33(1), pages 183-201, March.
    13. Rosangela Bando & Francisco Gallego & Paul Gertler & Dario Romero Fonseca, 2016. "Books or Laptops? The Cost-Effectiveness of Shifting from Printed to Digital Delivery of Educational Content," Documentos de Trabajo 474, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    14. Fairlie, Robert W. & Bahr, Peter Riley, 2018. "The effects of computers and acquired skills on earnings, employment and college enrollment: Evidence from a field experiment and California UI earnings records," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 51-63.

  4. Paulo Bastos & Lucio Castro & Julian Cristia & Carlos Scartascini, 2015. "Does Energy Consumption Respond to Price Shocks? Evidence from a Regression-Discontinuity Design," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(2), pages 249-278, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Cristia, Julian & Prado, Ariadna García & Peluffo, Cecilia, 2015. "The Impact of Contracting in and Contracting out Basic Health Services: The Guatemalan Experience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 215-227.

    Cited by:

    1. Hoey, Lesli, 2017. "Reclaiming the Authority to Plan: How the Legacy of Structural Adjustment Affected Bolivia’s Effort to Recentralize Nutrition Planning," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 100-112.

  6. Busso, Matias & Cristia, Julian & Humpage, Sarah, 2015. "Did you get your shots? Experimental evidence on the role of reminders," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 226-237.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Julian Cristia & Alejo Czerwonko & Pablo Garofalo, 2014. "Does technology in schools affect repetition, dropout and enrollment? Evidence from Peru," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 17, pages 89-112, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  8. Bastos, Paulo & Cristia, Julian, 2012. "Supply and quality choices in private child care markets: Evidence from São Paulo," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 242-255.

    Cited by:

    1. Paulo Bastos & Odd Rune Straume, 2013. "Preschool education in Brazil:Does public supply crowd out private enrollment?," NIPE Working Papers 16/2013, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    2. Zierow, Larissa, 2017. "Regulating Child Care Markets. Center-based Care vs. Family Day-Care in Germany," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168052, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

  9. Cristia, Julian P., 2009. "Rising mortality and life expectancy differentials by lifetime earnings in the United States," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 984-995, September. See citations under working paper version above.
  10. Julian P. Cristia, 2008. "The Effect of a First Child on Female Labor Supply: Evidence from Women Seeking Fertility Services," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(3), pages 487-510.

    Cited by:

    1. Doreen Triebe, 2013. "Wo(men) at Work?: The Impact of Cohabiting and Married Partners' Earning on Women's Work Hours," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 614, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Frühwirth-Schnatter, Sylvia & Pamminger, Christoph & Weber, Andrea & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2014. "When Is the Best Time to Give Birth?," IZA Discussion Papers 8396, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Claudia Hupkau & Marion Leturcq, 2017. "Fertility and Mothers' Labor Supply: New Evidence Using Time-to-Conception," CEP Discussion Papers dp1463, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Sylvia Frühwirth-Schnatter & Christoph Pamminger & Andrea Weber & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2016. "Mothers' long-run career patterns after first birth," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 179(3), pages 707-725, June.
    5. Massimiliano Bratti & Laura Cavalli, 2014. "Delayed First Birth and New Mothers’ Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from Biological Fertility Shocks," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(1), pages 35-63, February.
    6. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Lundborg, Petter & Vikström, Johan, 2012. "The Economics of Grief," IZA Discussion Papers 7010, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Bratti, Massimiliano & Frattini, Tommaso & Scervini, Francesco, 2017. "Grandparental availability for child care and maternal labor force participation: Pension reform evidence from Italy," Working Papers 2017-03, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Ispra site).
    8. Griffen, Andrew S. & Nakamuro, Makiko & Inui, Tomohiko, 2015. "Fertility and maternal labor supply in Japan: Conflicting policy goals?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 52-72.
    9. Cáceres-Delpiano, Julio, 2008. "Keeping the best for last. Impact of fertility on mother's employment. Evidence from developing countries," UC3M Working papers. Economics we086832, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    10. Lundborg, Petter & Plug, Erik & Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz, 2014. "Fertility Effects on Female Labor Supply: IV Evidence from IVF Treatments," IZA Discussion Papers 8609, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Matthias Krapf & Heinrich Ursprung & Christian Zimmermann, 2014. "Parenthood and Productivity of Highly Skilled Labor: Evidence from the Groves of Academe," CESifo Working Paper Series 4641, CESifo Group Munich.
    12. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak, 2014. "The causal effects of the number of children on female employment-do European institutional and gender conditions matter?," Working Papers 64, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    13. Bernd Fitzenberger & Katrin Sommerfeld & Susanne Steffes, 2013. "Causal Effects on Employment after First Birth: A Dynamic Treatment Approach," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 576, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    14. Concetta Rondinelli & Roberta Zizza, 2010. "(Non)persistent effects of fertility on female labour supply," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 783, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    15. Daniel Aaronson & Rajeev Dehejia & Andrew Jordan & Cristian Pop-Eleches & Cyrus Samii & Karl Schulze, 2017. "The Effect of Fertility on Mothers’ Labor Supply over the Last Two Centuries," NBER Working Papers 23717, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Petter Lundborg & Erik Plug & Astrid Würtz Rasmussen, 2017. "Can Women Have Children and a Career? IV Evidence from IVF Treatments," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(6), pages 1611-1637, June.
    17. Fane Groes & Daniela Iorio & Man Yee (Mallory) Leung & Raül Santaeulàlia-Llopis, 2017. "Educational Disparities in the Battle Against Infertility: Evidence from IVF Success," Working Papers 977, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    18. Sara Oloomi, 2016. "Impact of Paid Family Leave of California on Delayed Childbearing and on Infant Health Outcomes," Departmental Working Papers 2016-08, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    19. Kevin Stange, 2011. "A Longitudinal Analysis of the Relationship Between Fertility Timing and Schooling," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(3), pages 931-956, August.
    20. Anna Baranowska, 2013. "The family size effects on female employment. Evidence from the “natural experiments” related to human reproduction," Working Papers 57, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    21. Alba, Alfonso & Cáceres-Delpiano, Julio, 2013. "The effects of children on mothers' employment and earnings : evidence from Spain," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1313, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    22. Sara Cools & Simen Markussen & Marte Strøm, 2017. "Children and Careers: How Family Size Affects Parents’ Labor Market Outcomes in the Long Run," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(5), pages 1773-1793, October.
    23. Cáceres-Delpiano, Julio & Simonsen, Marianne, 2012. "The toll of fertility on mothers’ wellbeing," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 752-766.
    24. Frühwirth-Schnatter, Sylvia & Pamminger, Christoph & Weber, Andrea & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2014. "When Is The Best Time To Give Birth - Career Effects Of Early Birth Decisions," CEPR Discussion Papers 10132, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    25. Miguel Jaramillo-Baanante, 2017. "Fertility and women’s work in a demographic transition: evidence from Peru," Working Papers 2017-90, Peruvian Economic Association.
    26. Markussen, Simen & Strøm, Marte, 2015. "The Effects of Motherhood," Memorandum 19/2015, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    27. Fernández-Kranz Daniel & Aitor Lacuesta & Núria Rodríguez-Planas, 2013. "The Motherhood Earnings Dip: Evidence from Administrative Records," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(1), pages 169-197.
    28. Matias Busso & Dario Romero Fonseca, 2015. "Female Labor Force Participation in Latin America: Patterns and Explanations," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0187, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    29. Carlianne Patrick & Heather Stephens & Amanda Weinstein, 2016. "Where are all the self-employed women? Push and pull factors influencing female labor market decisions," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 365-390, March.
    30. Jorge M. Agüero & Mindy S. Marks, 2011. "Motherhood and Female Labor Supply in the Developing World: Evidence from Infertility Shocks," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(4), pages 800-826.
    31. Julio Cáceres-Delpiano, 2012. "Can We Still Learn Something From the Relationship Between Fertility and Mother’s Employment? Evidence From Developing Countries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(1), pages 151-174, February.
    32. Amalia Miller, 2011. "The effects of motherhood timing on career path," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(3), pages 1071-1100, July.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

Books

  1. María Caridad Araujo & Martín Ardanaz & Edna Armendáriz & Jere R. Behrman & Samuel Berlinski & Julian P. Cristia & Luca Flabbi & Diana Hincapie & Analía Jalmovich & Sharon Lynn Kagan & Florencia López, 2015. "The Early Years: Child Well-being and the Role of Public Policy," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 7259 edited by Samuel Berlinski & Norbert Schady, September.

    Cited by:

    1. M. Caridad Araujo & Mariano Bosch & Norbert Schady, 2017. "Can Cash Transfers Help Households Escape an Inter-Generational Poverty Trap?," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Poverty Traps National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. World Bank, 2017. "Pre-Primary Education in Mongolia," World Bank Other Operational Studies 26402, The World Bank.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 14 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (6) 2010-08-14 2014-03-01 2014-09-08 2014-09-08 2016-03-17 2016-11-06. Author is listed
  2. NEP-EDU: Education (4) 2014-03-01 2014-09-08 2016-03-17 2016-11-06
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (3) 2011-12-19 2014-09-08 2016-03-17
  4. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (3) 2009-01-31 2011-12-19 2012-03-28
  5. NEP-ICT: Information & Communication Technologies (3) 2012-05-15 2014-03-01 2014-09-08
  6. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (3) 2009-01-31 2010-08-14 2012-03-21
  7. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (2) 2011-12-19 2014-03-15
  8. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (2) 2011-02-05 2014-03-15
  9. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2009-01-31
  10. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2016-11-06
  11. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (1) 2009-01-31
  12. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (1) 2014-03-01
  13. NEP-REG: Regulation (1) 2011-02-05

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