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The Empirical Relationship Between Lifetime Earnings and Mortality: Working Paper 2007-11

  • Julian P. Cristia

Researchers have estimated differential mortality across socioeconomic groups by classifying individuals using income in the previous year. The first problem with this strategy is reverse causation. Second, annual income is a noisy measure of permanent income. This paper tackles these two drawbacks by using better measures of lifetime earnings from administrative records to classify individuals. Results indicate that the relationship between mortality and lifetime earnings is very strong, is weaker for women than for men, varies when individual versus household earnings is used, is less

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Paper provided by Congressional Budget Office in its series Working Papers with number 19096.

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Date of creation: 01 Aug 2007
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Handle: RePEc:cbo:wpaper:19096
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  1. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 2000. "How Effective is Redistribution Under the Social Security Benefit Formula?," NBER Working Papers 7597, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Harriet Duleep, 1989. "Measuring socioeconomic mortality differentials over time," Demography, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 345-351, May.
  3. Harriet Orcutt Duleep, 1986. "Measuring the Effect of Income on Adult Mortality Using Longitudinal Administrative Record Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(2), pages 238-251.
  4. Brian S. Armour & M. Melinda Pitts, 2002. "Incorporating insurance rate estimates and differential mortality into net marginal Social Security tax rate calculations," Working Paper 2002-29, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
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