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The Empirical Relationship Between Lifetime Earnings and Mortality: Working Paper 2007-11

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  • Julian P. Cristia

Abstract

Researchers have estimated differential mortality across socioeconomic groups by classifying individuals using income in the previous year. The first problem with this strategy is reverse causation. Second, annual income is a noisy measure of permanent income. This paper tackles these two drawbacks by using better measures of lifetime earnings from administrative records to classify individuals. Results indicate that the relationship between mortality and lifetime earnings is very strong, is weaker for women than for men, varies when individual versus household earnings is used, is less

Suggested Citation

  • Julian P. Cristia, 2007. "The Empirical Relationship Between Lifetime Earnings and Mortality: Working Paper 2007-11," Working Papers 19096, Congressional Budget Office.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbo:wpaper:19096
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    File URL: https://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/110th-congress-2007-2008/workingpaper/2007-11_0.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gustman, Alan L. & Steinmeier, Thomas L., 2001. "How effective is redistribution under the social security benefit formula?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 1-28, October.
    2. Harriet Duleep, 1989. "Measuring socioeconomic mortality differentials over time," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 26(2), pages 345-351, May.
    3. Harriet Orcutt Duleep, 1986. "Measuring the Effect of Income on Adult Mortality Using Longitudinal Administrative Record Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(2), pages 238-251.
    4. Brian S. Armour & M. Melinda Pitts, 2002. "Incorporating insurance rate estimates and differential mortality into net marginal Social Security tax rate calculations," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2002-29, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gopi Shah Goda & John B. Shoven & Sita Nataraj Slavov, 2011. "Differential Mortality by Income and Social Security Progressivity," NBER Chapters,in: Explorations in the Economics of Aging, pages 189-204 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. David N. Weil, 2015. "A Review of Angus Deaton's The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(1), pages 102-114, March.
    3. Gopi Shah Goda & John B. Shoven & Sita Nataraj Slavov, 2011. "How Well Are Social Security Recipients Protected from Inflation?," NBER Chapters,in: Investigations in the Economics of Aging, pages 119-139 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Bahram Sanginabadi, 2017. "Resource Abundance and Life Expectancy," Papers 1801.00369, arXiv.org.
    5. Cocco, João F. & Gomes, Francisco J., 2012. "Longevity risk, retirement savings, and financial innovation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(3), pages 507-529.

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