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Access to pre-primary education and progression in primary School : evidence from rural Guatemala

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  • Bastos,Paulo S. R.
  • Bottan,Nicolas Luis
  • Cristia,Julian
  • Bastos,Paulo S. R.
  • Bottan,Nicolas Luis
  • Cristia,Julian

Abstract

Evidence on the impacts of a large-scale expansion in pre-primary education is limited and mostly circumscribed to high- and middle-income nations. This study estimates the effects of such an expansion on progression in primary school in rural communities in Guatemala, where the number of pre-primary schools increased from about 5,300 to 11,500 between 1998 and 2005. Combining administrative and population census data in a difference-in-differences framework, the analysis finds that access to pre-primary education increased by 2.4 percentage points the proportion of students that progress adequately and attend sixth grade by age 12. These positive although limited effects suggest the need for complementary actions to produce substantial improvements in adequate progression.

Suggested Citation

  • Bastos,Paulo S. R. & Bottan,Nicolas Luis & Cristia,Julian & Bastos,Paulo S. R. & Bottan,Nicolas Luis & Cristia,Julian, 2016. "Access to pre-primary education and progression in primary School : evidence from rural Guatemala," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7574, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7574
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    Cited by:

    1. Blimpo, Moussa P. & Carneiro, Pedro & Jervis, Pamela & Pugatch, Todd, 2019. "Improving Access and Quality in Early Childhood Development Programs: Experimental Evidence from The Gambia," GLO Discussion Paper Series 318, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Jens Dietrichson & Ida Lykke Kristiansen & Bjørn A. Viinholt, 2020. "Universal Preschool Programs And Long‐Term Child Outcomes: A Systematic Review," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(5), pages 1007-1043, December.
    3. Ryu, Hanbyul & Helfand, Steven M. & Moreira, Roni Barbosa, 2020. "Starting early and staying longer: The effects of a Brazilian primary schooling reform on student performance," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 130(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Access of Poor to Social Services; Services&Transfers to Poor; Economic Assistance; Disability; Educational Sciences; Primary Education; Nutrition; Gender and Development;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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