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Claudia Hupkau

Personal Details

First Name:Claudia
Middle Name:
Last Name:Hupkau
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:phu317
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Twitter: @claudiahupkau
Terminal Degree:2017 Département des sciences économiques; École des Sciences Économiques de Louvain; Louvain Institute of Data Analysis and Modelling in Economics and Statistics (LIDAM); Université Catholique de Louvain (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(80%) Colegio Universitario de Estudios Financieros (CUNEF)

Madrid, Spain
http://www.cunef.edu/
RePEc:edi:cunefes (more details at EDIRC)

(20%) Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)
London School of Economics (LSE)

London, United Kingdom
http://cep.lse.ac.uk/
RePEc:edi:celseuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Hupkau, Claudia & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2022. "Work and children in Spain: challenges and opportunities for equality between men and women," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 112541, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Claudia Hupkau & Ingo Isphording & Stephen Machin & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, 2021. "in brief... Losses in lockdown: jobs, income, education and mental health," CentrePiece - The magazine for economic performance 598, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Covid-19 and the work patterns of men and women," CentrePiece - The magazine for economic performance 582, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Esteban M. Aucejo & Claudia Hupkau & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, 2020. "Where versus What: College Value-Added and Returns to Field of Study in Further Education," CVER Research Papers 030, Centre for Vocational Education Research.
  5. Hupkau, Claudia & Isphording, Ingo E. & Machin, Stephen & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2020. "Labour Market Shocks during the COVID-19 Pandemic, Inequalities and Child Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 14000, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  6. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, care and gender during the Covid-19 crisis," CEP Covid-19 Analyses cepcovid-19-002, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  7. Claudia Hupkau & François Maniquet, 2018. "Identity, non-take-up and welfare conditionality," LIDAM Reprints CORE 2940, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  8. Claudia Hupkau & Marion Leturcq, 2017. "Fertility and mothers' labor supply: new evidence using time-to-conception," CEP Discussion Papers dp1463, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  9. Hupkau, Claudia & McNally, Sandra & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer & Ventura, Guglielmo, 2017. "Post-compulsory education in England: choices and implications," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 78198, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  10. Eyles, Andrew & Hupkau, Claudia & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "School reforms and pupil performance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67141, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  11. Claudia Hupkau & Sandra McNally & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela & Guglielmo Ventura, 2016. "Post-16 educational choices in England," CentrePiece - The magazine for economic performance 481, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

Articles

  1. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, Care and Gender during the COVID‐19 Crisis," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 41(3), pages 623-651, September.
  2. Hupkau, Claudia & Maniquet, François, 2018. "Identity, non-take-up and welfare conditionality," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 13-27.
  3. Claudia Hupkau & Sandra McNally & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela & Guglielmo Ventura, 2017. "Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 240(1), pages 42-57, May.
  4. Andrew Eyles & Claudia Hupkau & Stephen Machin, 2016. "Academies, charter and free schools: do new school types deliver better outcomes?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 31(87), pages 453-501.
  5. Eyles, Andrew & Hupkau, Claudia & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "School reforms and pupil performance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 9-19.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

RePEc Biblio mentions

As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography of Economics:
  1. Hupkau, Claudia & Isphording, Ingo E. & Machin, Stephen & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2020. "Labour Market Shocks during the COVID-19 Pandemic, Inequalities and Child Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 14000, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Intra-household allocation
  2. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, care and gender during the Covid-19 crisis," CEP Discussion Papers dp1723, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Intra-household allocation
    2. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Intra-household allocation
  3. Hupkau, Claudia & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2020. "Work, Care and Gender during the COVID-19 Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 13762, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Intra-household allocation
    2. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Intra-household allocation

Working papers

  1. Hupkau, Claudia & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2022. "Work and children in Spain: challenges and opportunities for equality between men and women," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 112541, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Maite Blázquez & Ainhoa Herrarte & Ana I. Moro Egido, 2021. "Has the COVID-19 pandemic widened the gender gap in paid work hours in Spain?," ThE Papers 21/05, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
    2. Diachkova, Anna V. & Kontoboitseva, Anna E., 2022. "Economic Benefits of gender equality: comparing EU and BRICS countries," Economic Consultant, Roman I. Ostapenko, vol. 37(1), pages 4-15.

  2. Hupkau, Claudia & Isphording, Ingo E. & Machin, Stephen & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2020. "Labour Market Shocks during the COVID-19 Pandemic, Inequalities and Child Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 14000, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Haelermans, Carla & Jacobs, Madelon & van Vugt, Lynn & Aarts, Bas & Abbink, Henry & Smeets, Chayenne & van der Velden, Rolf & van Wetten, Sanne, 2021. "A full year COVID-19 crisis with interrupted learning and two school closures: The effects on learning growth and inequality in primary education," ROA Research Memorandum 009, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    2. Major, Lee Elliott & Eyles, Andrew & Machin, Stephen, 2021. "Unequal learning and labour market losses in the crisis: consequences for social mobility," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 114413, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Katharina Werner & Ludger Woessmann, 2021. "The Legacy of Covid-19 in Education," CESifo Working Paper Series 9358, CESifo.
    4. Lindley, Joanne & Rienzo, Cinzia, 2021. "The Effect of Repeated Lockdowns during the Covid-19 Pandemic on UK Mental Health Outcomes," GLO Discussion Paper Series 977, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    5. Elvira P. de Lara-Tuprio & Maria Regina Justina E. Estuar & Joselito T. Sescon & Cymon Kayle Lubangco & Rolly Czar Joseph T. Castillo & Timothy Robin Y. Teng & Lenard Paulo V. Tamayo & Jay Michael R. , 2022. "Economic losses from COVID-19 cases in the Philippines: a dynamic model of health and economic policy trade-offs," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 9(1), pages 1-10, December.

  3. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, care and gender during the Covid-19 crisis," CEP Covid-19 Analyses cepcovid-19-002, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Claudia Andrade & Martie Gillen & José Alberto Molina & Melissa J. Wilmarth, 2022. "The Social and Economic Impact of Covid-19 on Family Functioning and Well-Being: Where do we go from here?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 205-212, June.
    2. Mr. Damiano Sandri & Mr. Francesco Grigoli & Mr. Antonio Spilimbergo & Mr. Francesco Caselli, 2020. "Mobility under the COVID-19 Pandemic: Asymmetric Effects across Gender and Age," IMF Working Papers 2020/282, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Melanie Knight & Renée Nichole Ferguson & Rai Reece, 2021. "“It’s Not Just about Work and Living Conditions”: The Underestimation of the COVID-19 Pandemic for Black Canadian Women," Social Sciences, MDPI, vol. 10(6), pages 1-17, June.
    4. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, care and gender during the Covid-19 crisis," CEP Covid-19 Analyses cepcovid-19-002, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    5. Giulia Bettin & Isabella Giorgetti & Stefano Staffolani, 2022. "The Impact Of Covid-19 Lockdown On The Gender Gap In The Italian Labour Market," Working Papers 460, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    6. Nicholas Bloom & Robert S. Fletcher & Ethan Yeh, 2021. "The impact of Covid-19 on US firms," CEP Discussion Papers dp1788, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    7. Leonardo Fabio Morales & Leonardo Bonilla‐Mejía & Jose Pulido & Luz A. Flórez & Didier Hermida & Karen L. Pulido‐Mahecha & Francisco Lasso‐Valderrama, 2022. "Effects of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the Colombian labour market: Disentangling the effect of sector‐specific mobility restrictions," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 55(S1), pages 308-357, February.
    8. Boll, Christina & Müller, Dana & Schüller, Simone, 2021. "Neither Backlash nor Convergence: Dynamics of Intracouple Childcare Division after the First COVID-19 Lockdown and Subsequent Reopening in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 14375, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Tom Kirchmaier & Carmen Villa-Llera, 2020. "Covid-19 and changing crime trends in England and Wales," CEP Covid-19 Analyses cepcovid-19-013, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    10. Lidia Farré & Yarine Fawaz & Libertad González Luna & Jennifer Graves, 2020. "How the covid-19 lockdown affected gender Inequality in paid and unpaid work in Spain," Economics Working Papers 1728, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    11. Davide Torre & Danilo Liuzzi & Rosario Maggistro & Simone Marsiglio, 2022. "Mobility Choices and Strategic Interactions in a Two-Group Macroeconomic–Epidemiological Model," Dynamic Games and Applications, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 110-132, March.
    12. Mathias Huebener & Sevrin Waights & C. Katharina Spiess & Nico A. Siegel & Gert G. Wagner, 2021. "Parental well-being in times of Covid-19 in Germany," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 91-122, March.
    13. Titan Alon & Sena Coskun & Matthias Doepke & David Koll & Michèle Tertilt, 2022. "From Mancession to Shecession: Women’s Employment in Regular and Pandemic Recessions," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(1), pages 83-151.
    14. Prerna Banati & Nicola Jones & Sally Youssef, 2020. "Intersecting Vulnerabilities: The Impacts of COVID-19 on the Psycho-emotional Lives of Young People in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 32(5), pages 1613-1638, December.
    15. Juliane Hennecke & Astrid Pape, 2021. "Suddenly a Stay-At-Home Dad? Short- and Long-term Consequences of Fathers’ Job Loss on Time Investment in the Household," Working Papers 2021-05, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
    16. Costoya, Victoria & Echeverría, Lucía & Edo, María & Rocha, Ana & Thailinger, Agustina, 2020. "The impact of COVID-19 in the allocation of time within couples. Evidence for Argentina," Nülan. Deposited Documents 3381, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales, Centro de Documentación.
    17. Viollaz, Mariana & Salazar-Saenz, Mauricio & Flabbi, Luca & Bustelo, Monserrat & Bosch, Mariano, 2022. "The COVID-19 Pandemic in Latin American and Caribbean Countries: The Labor Supply Impact by Gender," IZA Discussion Papers 15091, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    18. Oreffice, Sonia & Quintana-Domeque, Climent, 2020. "Gender inequality in COVID-19 times: Evidence from UK Prolific participants," GLO Discussion Paper Series 738, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    19. Stefanie Stantcheva, 2022. "Inequalities in the Times of a Pandemic," NBER Working Papers 29657, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Bozena Wielgoszewska & Alex Bryson & Monica Costa-Dias & Francesca Foliano & Heather Joshi & David Wilkinson, 2021. "Exploring the Reasons for Labour Market Gender Inequality a Year into the Covid-19 Pandemic: Evidence from the UK Cohort Studies," DoQSS Working Papers 21-23, Quantitative Social Science - UCL Social Research Institute, University College London.
    21. Anne Boring & Gloria Moroni, 2022. "Turning back the clock: Beliefs about gender roles during lockdown," Post-Print hal-03627187, HAL.
    22. Maite Blázquez & Ainhoa Herrarte & Ana I. Moro Egido, 2021. "Has the COVID-19 pandemic widened the gender gap in paid work hours in Spain?," ThE Papers 21/05, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
    23. Thomas Crossley & Paul Fisher & Peter Levell & Hamish Low, 2021. "A year of COVID: the evolution of labour market and financial inequalities through the crisis," IFS Working Papers W21/39, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    24. Makoto Nirei & Nao Sudo, 2020. "Necessities, Home Production, and Economic Impacts of Stay-at-Home Policies," IMES Discussion Paper Series 20-E-14, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    25. Kugler, Maurice & Viollaz, Mariana & Duque, Daniel & Gaddis, Isis & Newhouse, David & Palacios-Lopez, Amparo & Weber, Michael, 2021. "How Did the COVID-19 Crisis Affect Different Types of Workers in the Developing World?," IZA Discussion Papers 14519, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    26. Reuschke, Darja & Henley, Andrew & Daniel, Elizabeth & Price, Victoria, 2021. "Testing the Differential Impact of COVID-19 on Self-Employed Women and Men in the United Kingdom," IZA Discussion Papers 14216, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    27. Pamela Campa & Jesper Roine & Svante Strömberg, 2021. "Unequal Labour Market Impacts of COVID-19 in Sweden — But Not Between Women and Men," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 56(5), pages 264-269, September.
    28. Judith Derndorfer & Franziska Disslbacher & Vanessa Lechinger & Katharina Mader & Eva Six, 2021. "Home, sweet home? The impact of working from home on the division of unpaid work during the COVID-19 lockdown," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 16(11), pages 1-26, November.
    29. Sonia OREFICCE & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2021. "Gender inequality in COVID-19 times: evidence from UK prolific participants," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 87(2), pages 261-287, June.
    30. Davide Fiaschi & Cristina Tealdi, 2022. "Scarring effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Italian labour market," Papers 2202.13317, arXiv.org.
    31. Mangiavacchi, Lucia & Piccoli, Luca & Pieroni, Luca, 2021. "Fathers matter: Intrahousehold responsibilities and children's wellbeing during the COVID-19 lockdown in Italy," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 42(C).
    32. Hupkau, Claudia & Isphording, Ingo E. & Machin, Stephen & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2020. "Labour Market Shocks during the COVID-19 Pandemic, Inequalities and Child Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 14000, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    33. Jack Blundell & Stephen Machin & Maria Ventura, 2020. "Covid-19 and the self-employed: six months into the crisis," CEP Covid-19 Analyses cepcovid-19-012, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    34. Fasani, Francesco & Mazza, Jacopo, 2020. "Being on the Frontline? Immigrant Workers in Europe and the COVID-19 Pandemic," CEPR Discussion Papers 15590, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    35. Izaskun Barba & Belen Iraizoz, 2020. "Effect of the Great Crisis on Sectoral Female Employment in Europe: A Structural Decomposition Analysis," Economies, MDPI, vol. 8(3), pages 1-24, August.
    36. Jack Blundell & Stephen Machin, 2020. "Self-employment in the Covid-19 crisis," CEP Covid-19 Analyses cepcovid-19-003, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    37. Alina Simona Tecau & Cristinel Petrisor Constantin & Radu Constantin Lixandroiu & Ioana Bianca Chitu & Gabriel Bratucu, 2020. "Impact of the COVID-19 Crisis on Heavy Work Investment in Romania," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 22(Special 1), pages 1049-1049, November.
    38. Pia Andres & Giorgia Cecchinato & Penny Mealy & Charlotte Taylor & Sam Unsworth & Anna Valero, 2020. "Jobs for a strong and sustainable recovery from Covid-19," CEP Covid-19 Analyses cepcovid-19-010, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    39. Costoya, Victoria & Echeverría, Lucía & Edo, María & Rocha, Ana & Thailinger, Agustina, 2021. "Gender gaps within couples: Evidence of time re-allocations during COVID-19 in Argentina," Nülan. Deposited Documents 3506, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales, Centro de Documentación.
    40. Panayiota Lyssiotou & Ruzica Savcic, 2022. "Parents' Time Allocation in Different Phases of the Covid-19 Pandemic: Evidence from the UK and Implications for Gender Equality," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 03-2022, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    41. Andrew, Alison & Cattan, Sarah & Costa Dias, Monica & Farquharson, Christine & Kraftman, Lucy & Krutikova, Sonya & Phimister, Angus & Sevilla, Almudena, 2020. "The Gendered Division of Paid and Domestic Work under Lockdown," IZA Discussion Papers 13500, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    42. Scott, Douglas & Freund, Richard & Favara, Marta & Porter, Catherine & Sanchez, Alan, 2021. "Unpacking the Post-lockdown Employment Recovery of Young Women in the Global South," IZA Discussion Papers 14829, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    43. Jack Blundell & Stephen Machin & Maria Ventura, 2021. "Covid-19 and the self-employed - ten months into the crisis," CEP Covid-19 Analyses cepcovid-19-019, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    44. Blundell, Jack & Machin, Stephen, 2020. "Self-employment in the Covid-19 crisis: a CEP Covid-19 analysis," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 104550, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    45. Yamaguchi Shintaro & Daiji Kawaguchi, 2021. "Covid-19 and the Employment Gender Gap," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2126, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    46. Alejandra Rodríguez Sánchez & Anette Fasang & Susan Harkness, 2021. "Gender division of housework during the COVID-19 pandemic: Temporary shocks or durable change?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 45(43), pages 1297-1316.
    47. Brian Bell & Mihai Codreanu & Stephen Machin, 2020. "What can previous recessions tell us about the Covid-19 downturn?," CEP Covid-19 Analyses cepcovid-19-007, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    48. Daniela Casale & Debra Shepherd, 2020. "The gendered effects of the ongoing lockdown and school closures in South Africa: Evidence from NIDS-CRAM Waves 1 and 2," Working Papers 21/2020, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    49. Elisa Brini & Stefani Scherer & Agnese Vitali & Mariya Lenko, 2021. "Retraditionalisation? Work patterns of families with children during the pandemic in Italy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 45(31), pages 957-972.
    50. Sara Grubanov-Boskovic & Spyridon Spyratos & Stefano Maria Iacus & Umberto Minora & Francesco Sermi, 2021. "Monitoring COVID-19-induced gender differences in teleworking rates using Mobile Network Data," Papers 2111.09442, arXiv.org, revised Nov 2021.
    51. Stefanie Huber, 2022. "SHE canÕt afford it and HE doesnÕt want it: The gender gap in the COVID-19 consumption response," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 22-029/II, Tinbergen Institute.
    52. Paudel, Jayash, 2021. "Home Alone: Implications of COVID-19 for Mental Health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 285(C).
    53. Monika Queisser, 2021. "COVID-19 and OECD Labour Markets: What Impact on Gender Gaps?," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 56(5), pages 249-253, September.
    54. Claudia Hupkau & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, 2022. "Work and children in Spain: challenges and opportunities for equality between men and women," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 13(1), pages 243-268, May.
    55. Anna Zamberlan & Filippo Gioachin & Davide Gritti, 2022. "Gender inequality in domestic chores over ten months of the UK COVID-19 pandemic: Heterogeneous adjustments to partners’ changes in working hours," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 46(19), pages 565-580.
    56. Jessen, Jonas & Spieß, C. Katharina & Waights, Sevrin & Wrohlich, Katharina, 2021. "Sharing the Caring? The Gender Division of Care Work during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 14457, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    57. Jones, Melanie, 2022. "COVID-19 and the labour market outcomes of disabled people in the UK," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 292(C).

  4. Claudia Hupkau & François Maniquet, 2018. "Identity, non-take-up and welfare conditionality," LIDAM Reprints CORE 2940, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).

    Cited by:

    1. Kurita, Kenichi & Hori, Nobuaki & Katafuchi, Yuya, 2019. "Model of endogenous welfare stigma: Statistical discrimination view," MPRA Paper 96836, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Kurita, Kenichi & Hori, Nobuaki & Katafuchi, Yuya, 2020. "Stigma model of welfare fraud and non-take-up: Theory and evidence from OECD panel data," MPRA Paper 102009, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Kino, Shiho & Nishioka, Daisuke & Ueno, Keiko & Saito, Masashige & Kondo, Naoki, 2022. "Changes in social relationships by the initiation and termination of public assistance in the older Japanese population: A JAGES panel study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 293(C).
    4. Gyubeom Park & Kichan Yoon & Munjae Lee, 2021. "Regional Factors Influencing Non-Take-Up for Social Support in Korea Using a Spatial Regression Model," SAGE Open, , vol. 11(4), pages 21582440211, December.
    5. Pierpaolo Battigalli & Martin Dufwenberg, 2020. "Belief-Dependent Motivations and Psychological Game Theory," CESifo Working Paper Series 8285, CESifo.

  5. Hupkau, Claudia & McNally, Sandra & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer & Ventura, Guglielmo, 2017. "Post-compulsory education in England: choices and implications," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 78198, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Maragkou, Konstantina, 2020. "Socio-economic inequality and academic match among post-compulsory education participants," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 79(C).
    2. Hector Espinoza & Stefan Speckesser, 2019. "A Comparison of Earnings Related to Higher Level Vocational/Technical and Academic Education," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 502, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    3. Machin, Stephen & McNally, Sandra & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2018. "Entry Through the Narrow Door: The Costs of Just Failing High Stakes Exams," IZA Discussion Papers 11476, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Gill Wyness, 2021. "Should we abolish GCSEs?," CEPEO Briefing Note Series 14, UCL Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities, revised Aug 2021.
    5. Emily McDool & Damon Morris, 2020. "Gender and Socio-Economic Differences in STEM Uptake and Attainment," CVER Research Papers 029, Centre for Vocational Education Research.
    6. Sandra McNally & Luis Schmidt & Anna Valero, 2022. "Do Management Practices Matter in Further Education?," CVER Research Papers 036, Centre for Vocational Education Research.
    7. Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally & Camille Terrier & Guglielmo Ventura, 2020. "Closing the Gap Between Vocational and General Education? Evidence from University Technical Colleges in England," CVER Research Papers 031, Centre for Vocational Education Research.
    8. Chiara Cavaglia & Sandra McNally & Guglielmo Ventura, 2018. "Do apprenticeships pay? Evidence for England," CVER Research Papers 015, Centre for Vocational Education Research.
    9. Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela & Camille Terrier & Clémentine Van Effenterre, 2017. "Effectiveness of CEOs in the public sector: evidence from further education institutions," CVER Briefing Notes 005, Centre for Vocational Education Research.
    10. Sandra McNally, 2018. "Apprenticeships in England: what does research tell us?," CVER Briefing Notes 008, Centre for Vocational Education Research.
    11. Hector Espinoza & Stefan Speckesser, 2019. "A comparison of earnings related to higher level vocational/technical and academic education," CVER Research Papers 019, Centre for Vocational Education Research.
    12. Hupkau, Claudia & McNally, Sandra & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer & Ventura, Guglielmo, 2017. "Post-compulsory education in England: choices and implications," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 78198, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    13. Jiaqi Li & Anna Valero & Guglielmo Ventura, 2020. "Trends in job-related training and policies for building future skills into the recovery," CVER Research Papers 033, Centre for Vocational Education Research.
    14. Martin McGuigan & Sandra McNally & Gill Wyness, 2016. "Student Awareness of Costs and Benefits of Educational Decisions: Effects of an Information Campaign," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(4), pages 482-519.
    15. Sophie Hedges & Vahé Nafilyan & Stefan Speckesser & Augustin de Coulon, 2017. "Young people in low level vocational education: characteristics, trajectories and labour market outcomes," CVER Research Papers 004, Centre for Vocational Education Research.

  6. Eyles, Andrew & Hupkau, Claudia & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "School reforms and pupil performance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67141, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Machin, Stephen & Sandi, Matteo, 2018. "Autonomous Schools and Strategic Pupil Exclusion," IZA Discussion Papers 11478, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Bryson, Alex & Green, Francis, 2018. "Do Private Schools Manage Better?," National Institute Economic Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 243, pages 17-26, February.
    3. Andrew Eyles & Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally, 2016. "Unexpected school reform: academisation of primary schools in England," CEP Discussion Papers dp1455, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Obergruber, Natalie & Zierow, Larissa, 2020. "Students’ behavioural responses to a fallback option - Evidence from introducing interim degrees in german schools," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 75(C).
    5. Joe Regan-Stansfield, 2016. "Do good primary schools perform even better as academies?," Working Papers 141167564, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    6. John Cullinan & Kevin Denny & Darragh Flannery, 2018. "A Distributional Analysis of Upper Secondary School Performance," Working Papers 201808, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    7. Foliano, Francesca & Green, Francis & Sartarelli, Marcello, 2019. "Away from home, better at school. The case of a British boarding school," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    8. Regan-Stansfield, Joseph, 2018. "Does greater primary school autonomy improve pupil attainment? Evidence from primary school converter academies in England✰," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 167-179.
    9. Francesca Foliano & Francis Green & Marcello Sartarelli, 2017. "Can Talented Pupils with Low Socio-economic Status Shine? Evidence from a Boarding School," Working Papers. Serie AD 2017-05, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).

  7. Claudia Hupkau & Sandra McNally & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela & Guglielmo Ventura, 2016. "Post-16 educational choices in England," CentrePiece - The magazine for economic performance 481, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Hector Espinoza & Stefan Speckesser, 2019. "A Comparison of Earnings Related to Higher Level Vocational/Technical and Academic Education," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 502, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    2. Hector Espinoza & Stefan Speckesser, 2019. "A comparison of earnings related to higher level vocational/technical and academic education," CVER Research Papers 019, Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Articles

  1. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, Care and Gender during the COVID‐19 Crisis," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 41(3), pages 623-651, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Hupkau, Claudia & Maniquet, François, 2018. "Identity, non-take-up and welfare conditionality," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 13-27.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Claudia Hupkau & Sandra McNally & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela & Guglielmo Ventura, 2017. "Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 240(1), pages 42-57, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Andrew Eyles & Claudia Hupkau & Stephen Machin, 2016. "Academies, charter and free schools: do new school types deliver better outcomes?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 31(87), pages 453-501.

    Cited by:

    1. Machin, Stephen & Sandi, Matteo, 2018. "Autonomous Schools and Strategic Pupil Exclusion," IZA Discussion Papers 11478, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Eyles, Andrew & Machin, Stephen, 2015. "The introduction of academy schools to England’seducation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 63815, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Andrew Eyles & Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally, 2016. "Unexpected school reform: academisation of primary schools in England," CEP Discussion Papers dp1455, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Andrew Eyles & Stephen Machin & Olmo Silva, 2018. "Academies 2 – The New Batch: The Changing Nature of Academy Schools in England," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 39(1), pages 121-158, March.
    5. Machin, Stephen & McNally, Sandra & Viarengo, Martina, 2018. "Changing how literacy is taught: evidence on synthetic phonics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 88350, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Eyles, Andrew & Hupkau, Claudia & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "School reforms and pupil performance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 9-19.
    7. Joe Regan-Stansfield, 2016. "Do good primary schools perform even better as academies?," Working Papers 141167564, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    8. Lorenzo Neri & Elisabetta Pasini, 2018. "Heterogeneous Effects of Mass Academisation in England," Working Papers 847, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    9. Crawfurd, Lee, 2017. "School Management and Public-Private Partnerships in Uganda," MPRA Paper 79923, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Liu, Yi & Bessudnov, Alexey & Black, Alison & Norwich, Brahm, 2019. "School autonomy and educational inclusion of children with special needs: Evidence from England," SocArXiv y7z56, Center for Open Science.
    11. Regan-Stansfield, Joseph, 2018. "Does greater primary school autonomy improve pupil attainment? Evidence from primary school converter academies in England✰," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 167-179.
    12. Aedin Doris & Donal O'Neill & Olive Sweetman, 2019. "Good Schools or Good Students? The Importance of Selectivity for School Rankings," Economics Department Working Paper Series n293-19.pdf, Department of Economics, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    13. Francesca Marchetta & Tom Dilly, 2019. "Supporting Education in Africa: Opportunities and Challenges for an Impact Investor," Working Papers hal-02288103, HAL.

  5. Eyles, Andrew & Hupkau, Claudia & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "School reforms and pupil performance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 9-19.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 13 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (8) 2017-06-04 2020-06-15 2020-10-12 2021-01-11 2021-02-08 2021-05-24 2021-11-22 2022-07-18. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (5) 2017-01-29 2017-02-05 2020-10-12 2021-05-24 2022-07-18. Author is listed
  3. NEP-EDU: Education (3) 2016-10-16 2017-06-04 2017-12-03
  4. NEP-GEN: Gender (2) 2020-06-15 2021-11-22
  5. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (2) 2021-01-11 2021-01-25
  6. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2017-01-29 2020-10-12
  7. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (1) 2017-06-04
  8. NEP-EFF: Efficiency & Productivity (1) 2017-12-03
  9. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2020-06-15
  10. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2021-01-25
  11. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2021-01-25
  12. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2017-12-03

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