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Claudia Hupkau

Personal Details

First Name:Claudia
Middle Name:
Last Name:Hupkau
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:phu317
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Twitter: @claudiahupkau
Terminal Degree:2017 Département des sciences économiques; École des Sciences Économiques de Louvain; Louvain Institute of Data Analysis and Modelling in Economics and Statistics (LIDAM); Université Catholique de Louvain (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(80%) Colegio Universitario de Estudios Financieros (CUNEF)

Madrid, Spain
http://www.cunef.edu/
RePEc:edi:cunefes (more details at EDIRC)

(20%) Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)
London School of Economics (LSE)

London, United Kingdom
http://cep.lse.ac.uk/
RePEc:edi:celseuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Covid-19 and the work patterns of men and women," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 582, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. Hupkau, Claudia & Isphording, Ingo E. & Machin, Stephen & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2020. "Labour Market Shocks during the COVID-19 Pandemic, Inequalities and Child Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 14000, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  3. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, care and gender during the Covid-19 crisis," CEP Covid-19 Briefings cepcovid-19-002, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Claudia Hupkau & François Maniquet, 2018. "Identity, non-take-up and welfare conditionality," LIDAM Reprints CORE 2940, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  5. Claudia Hupkau & Marion Leturcq, 2017. "Fertility and Mothers' Labor Supply: New Evidence Using Time-to-Conception," CEP Discussion Papers dp1463, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  6. Hupkau, Claudia & McNally, Sandra & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer & Ventura, Guglielmo, 2017. "Post-compulsory education in England: choices and implications," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 78198, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  7. Claudia Hupkau & Sandra McNally & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela & Guglielmo Ventura, 2016. "Post-16 educational choices in England," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 481, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  8. Eyles, Andrew & Hupkau, Claudia & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "School reforms and pupil performance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67141, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    repec:cep:cverdp:030 is not listed on IDEAS

Articles

  1. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, Care and Gender during the COVID‐19 Crisis," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 41(3), pages 623-651, September.
  2. Hupkau, Claudia & Maniquet, François, 2018. "Identity, non-take-up and welfare conditionality," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 13-27.
  3. Claudia Hupkau & Sandra McNally & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela & Guglielmo Ventura, 2017. "Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 240(1), pages 42-57, May.
  4. Andrew Eyles & Claudia Hupkau & Stephen Machin, 2016. "Academies, charter and free schools: do new school types deliver better outcomes?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 31(87), pages 453-501.
  5. Eyles, Andrew & Hupkau, Claudia & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "School reforms and pupil performance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 9-19.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

RePEc Biblio mentions

As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography of Economics:
  1. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, care and gender during the Covid-19 crisis," CEP Discussion Papers dp1723, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Intra-household allocation
    2. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Intra-household allocation
  2. Hupkau, Claudia & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2020. "Work, Care and Gender during the COVID-19 Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 13762, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Intra-household allocation
    2. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Intra-household allocation
  3. Hupkau, Claudia & Isphording, Ingo E. & Machin, Stephen & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2020. "Labour Market Shocks during the COVID-19 Pandemic, Inequalities and Child Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 14000, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Employment and Work > Intra-household allocation

Working papers

  1. Hupkau, Claudia & Isphording, Ingo E. & Machin, Stephen & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2020. "Labour Market Shocks during the COVID-19 Pandemic, Inequalities and Child Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 14000, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Lee Elliot Major & Andrew Eyles & Stephen Machin, 2021. "Unequal Learning and Labour Market Losses in the Crisis: Consequences for Social Mobility," CEPEO Working Paper Series 21-02, Centre for Education Policy and Equalising Opportunities, UCL Institute of Education, revised Mar 2021.

  2. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, care and gender during the Covid-19 crisis," CEP Covid-19 Briefings cepcovid-19-002, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Sonia OREFICCE & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2021. "Gender inequality in COVID-19 times: evidence from UK prolific participants," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 87(2), pages 261-287, June.
    2. Mangiavacchi, Lucia & Piccoli, Luca & Pieroni, Luca, 2021. "Fathers matter: Intrahousehold responsibilities and children's wellbeing during the COVID-19 lockdown in Italy," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 42(C).
    3. Mr. Antonio Spilimbergo & Mr. Damiano Sandri & Mr. Francesco Grigoli & Francesca G Caselli, 2020. "Mobility under the COVID-19 Pandemic: Asymmetric Effects across Gender and Age," IMF Working Papers 2020/282, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Melanie Knight & Renée Nichole Ferguson & Rai Reece, 2021. "“It’s Not Just about Work and Living Conditions”: The Underestimation of the COVID-19 Pandemic for Black Canadian Women," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(6), pages 1-17, June.
    5. Hupkau, Claudia & Isphording, Ingo E. & Machin, Stephen & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer, 2020. "Labour Market Shocks during the COVID-19 Pandemic, Inequalities and Child Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 14000, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, care and gender during the Covid-19 crisis," CEP Covid-19 Briefings cepcovid-19-002, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    7. Fasani, Francesco & Mazza, Jacopo, 2020. "Being on the Frontline? Immigrant Workers in Europe and the COVID-19 Pandemic," CEPR Discussion Papers 15590, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Izaskun Barba & Belen Iraizoz, 2020. "Effect of the Great Crisis on Sectoral Female Employment in Europe: A Structural Decomposition Analysis," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-24, August.
    9. Hennecke, Juliane & Pape, Astrid, 2020. "Suddenly a Stay-at-Home Dad? Short- and Long-Term Consequences of Fathers' Job Loss on Time Investment in the Household," IZA Discussion Papers 13866, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Boll, Christina & Müller, Dana & Schüller, Simone, 2021. "Neither Backlash nor Convergence: Dynamics of Intracouple Childcare Division after the First COVID-19 Lockdown and Subsequent Reopening in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 14375, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Jack Blundell & Stephen Machin, 2020. "Self-employment in the Covid-19 crisis," CEP Covid-19 Briefings cepcovid-19-003, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    12. Mathias Huebener & Sevrin Waights & C. Katharina Spiess & Nico A. Siegel & Gert G. Wagner, 2020. "Parental Well-Being in Times of Covid-19 in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 1099, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    13. Alina Simona Tecau & Cristinel Petrisor Constantin & Radu Constantin Lixandroiu & Ioana Bianca Chitu & Gabriel Bratucu, 2020. "Impact of the COVID-19 Crisis on Heavy Work Investment in Romania," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 22(Special 1), pages 1049-1049, November.
    14. Nicholas Bloom & Robert S. Fletcher & Ethan Yeh, 2021. "The Impact of COVID-19 on US Firms," NBER Working Papers 28314, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Blundell, Jack & Machin, Stephen, 2020. "Self-employment in the Covid-19 crisis: a CEP Covid-19 analysis," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 104550, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    16. Costoya, Victoria & Echeverría, Lucía & Edo, María & Rocha, Ana & Thailinger, Agustina, 2020. "The impact of COVID-19 in the allocation of time within couples. Evidence for Argentina," Nülan. Deposited Documents 3381, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales, Centro de Documentación.
    17. Oreffice, Sonia & Quintana-Domeque, Climent, 2020. "Gender inequality in COVID-19 times: Evidence from UK Prolific participants," GLO Discussion Paper Series 738, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    18. Titan Alon & Sena Coskun & Matthias Doepke & David Koll & Michèle Tertilt, 2021. "From Mancession to Shecession: Women's Employment in Regular and Pandemic Recessions," NBER Working Papers 28632, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Derndorfer, Judith & Disslbacher, Franziska & Lechinger, Vanessa & Mär, Katharina & Six, Eva, 2021. "Home, sweet home? The impact of working from home on the division of unpaid work during the COVID-19 lockdown," SocArXiv 5ypb2, Center for Open Science.
    20. Daniela Casale & Debra Shepherd, 2020. "The gendered effects of the ongoing lockdown and school closures in South Africa: Evidence from NIDS-CRAM Waves 1 and 2," Working Papers 21/2020, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    21. Makoto Nirei & Nao Sudo, 2020. "Necessities, Home Production, and Economic Impacts of Stay-at-Home Policies," IMES Discussion Paper Series 20-E-14, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    22. Kugler, Maurice & Viollaz, Mariana & Duque, Daniel & Gaddis, Isis & Newhouse, David & Palacios-Lopez, Amparo & Weber, Michael, 2021. "How Did the COVID-19 Crisis Affect Different Types of Workers in the Developing World?," IZA Discussion Papers 14519, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    23. Reuschke, Darja & Henley, Andrew & Daniel, Elizabeth & Price, Victoria, 2021. "Testing the Differential Impact of COVID-19 on Self-Employed Women and Men in the United Kingdom," IZA Discussion Papers 14216, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    24. Jessen, Jonas & Spiess, C. Katharina & Waights, Sevrin & Wrohlich, Katharina, 2021. "Sharing the Caring? The Gender Division of Care Work during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 14457, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  3. Claudia Hupkau & François Maniquet, 2018. "Identity, non-take-up and welfare conditionality," LIDAM Reprints CORE 2940, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).

    Cited by:

    1. Kurita, Kenichi & Hori, Nobuaki & Katafuchi, Yuya, 2019. "Model of endogenous welfare stigma: Statistical discrimination view," MPRA Paper 96836, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Kurita, Kenichi & Hori, Nobuaki & Katafuchi, Yuya, 2020. "Stigma model of welfare fraud and non-take-up: Theory and evidence from OECD panel data," MPRA Paper 102009, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Pierpaolo Battigalli & Martin Dufwenberg, 2020. "Belief-Dependent Motivations and Psychological Game Theory," CESifo Working Paper Series 8285, CESifo.

  4. Hupkau, Claudia & McNally, Sandra & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer & Ventura, Guglielmo, 2017. "Post-compulsory education in England: choices and implications," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 78198, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Hupkau, Claudia & McNally, Sandra & Ruiz-Valenzuela, Jenifer & Ventura, Guglielmo, 2017. "Post-compulsory education in England: choices and implications," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 78198, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Maragkou, Konstantina, 2020. "Socio-economic inequality and academic match among post-compulsory education participants," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 79(C).
    3. Martin McGuigan & Sandra McNally & Gill Wyness, 2016. "Student Awareness of Costs and Benefits of Educational Decisions: Effects of an Information Campaign," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(4), pages 482-519.
    4. Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, 2018. "Entry Through the Narrow Door: The Costs of Just Failing High Stakes Exams," Working Papers 2018-029, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    5. Chiara Cavaglia & Sandra McNally & Guglielmo Ventura, 2020. "Do Apprenticeships Pay? Evidence for England," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 82(5), pages 1094-1134, October.

  5. Claudia Hupkau & Sandra McNally & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela & Guglielmo Ventura, 2016. "Post-16 educational choices in England," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 481, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Hector Espinoza & Stefan Speckesser, 2019. "A Comparison of Earnings Related to Higher Level Vocational/Technical and Academic Education," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 502, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

  6. Eyles, Andrew & Hupkau, Claudia & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "School reforms and pupil performance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67141, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Machin, Stephen & Sandi, Matteo, 2018. "Autonomous Schools and Strategic Pupil Exclusion," IZA Discussion Papers 11478, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. John Cullinan & Kevin Denny & Darragh Flannery, 2018. "A Distributional Analysis of Upper Secondary School Performance," Working Papers 201808, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    3. Alex Bryson & Francis Green, 2018. "Do Private Schools Manage Better?," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 243(1), pages 17-26, February.
    4. Foliano, Francesca & Green, Francis & Sartarelli, Marcello, 2019. "Away from home, better at school. The case of a British boarding school," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    5. Andrew Eyles & Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally, 2016. "Unexpected School Reform: Academisation of Primary Schools in England," CEP Discussion Papers dp1455, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    6. Regan-Stansfield, Joseph, 2018. "Does greater primary school autonomy improve pupil attainment? Evidence from primary school converter academies in England✰," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 167-179.
    7. Obergruber, Natalie & Zierow, Larissa, 2020. "Students’ behavioural responses to a fallback option - Evidence from introducing interim degrees in german schools," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 75(C).
    8. Francesca Foliano & Francis Green & Marcello Sartarelli, 2017. "Can Talented Pupils with Low Socio-economic Status Shine? Evidence from a Boarding School," Working Papers. Serie AD 2017-05, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    9. Joe Regan-Stansfield, 2016. "Do good primary schools perform even better as academies?," Working Papers 141167564, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.

Articles

  1. Claudia Hupkau & Barbara Petrongolo, 2020. "Work, Care and Gender during the COVID‐19 Crisis," Fiscal Studies, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 41(3), pages 623-651, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Hupkau, Claudia & Maniquet, François, 2018. "Identity, non-take-up and welfare conditionality," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 13-27.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Claudia Hupkau & Sandra McNally & Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela & Guglielmo Ventura, 2017. "Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 240(1), pages 42-57, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Andrew Eyles & Claudia Hupkau & Stephen Machin, 2016. "Academies, charter and free schools: do new school types deliver better outcomes?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 31(87), pages 453-501.

    Cited by:

    1. Machin, Stephen & Sandi, Matteo, 2018. "Autonomous Schools and Strategic Pupil Exclusion," IZA Discussion Papers 11478, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Lorenzo Neri & Elisabetta Pasini, 2018. "Heterogeneous Effects of Mass Academisation in England," Working Papers 847, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    3. Crawfurd, Lee, 2017. "School Management and Public-Private Partnerships in Uganda," MPRA Paper 79923, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Eyles, Andrew & Hupkau, Claudia & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "School reforms and pupil performance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67141, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Eyles, Andrew & Machin, Stephen, 2015. "The introduction of academy schools to England’seducation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 63815, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Eyles, Andrew & Machin, Stephen & Silva, Olmo, 2018. "Academies 2: the new batch - the changing nature of academy schools in England," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 79988, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Liu, Yi & Bessudnov, Alexey & Black, Alison & Norwich, Brahm, 2019. "School autonomy and educational inclusion of children with special needs: Evidence from England," SocArXiv y7z56, Center for Open Science.
    8. Andrew Eyles & Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally, 2016. "Unexpected School Reform: Academisation of Primary Schools in England," CEP Discussion Papers dp1455, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    9. Regan-Stansfield, Joseph, 2018. "Does greater primary school autonomy improve pupil attainment? Evidence from primary school converter academies in England✰," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 167-179.
    10. Machin, Stephen & McNally, Sandra & Viarengo, Martina, 2018. "Changing how literacy is taught: evidence on synthetic phonics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 88350, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    11. Aedin Doris & Donal O'Neill & Olive Sweetman, 2019. "Good Schools or Good Students? The Importance of Selectivity for School Rankings," Economics Department Working Paper Series n293-19.pdf, Department of Economics, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    12. Lorenzo Neri & Elisabetta Pasini, 2020. "Heterogeneous Effects of School Autonomy in England," Discussion Paper Series, School of Economics and Finance 202010, School of Economics and Finance, University of St Andrews.
    13. Joe Regan-Stansfield, 2016. "Do good primary schools perform even better as academies?," Working Papers 141167564, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    14. Francesca Marchetta & Tom Dilly, 2019. "Supporting Education in Africa: Opportunities and Challenges for an Impact Investor," Working Papers hal-02288103, HAL.

  5. Eyles, Andrew & Hupkau, Claudia & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "School reforms and pupil performance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 9-19.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 11 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (6) 2017-06-04 2020-06-15 2020-10-12 2021-01-11 2021-02-08 2021-05-24. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (4) 2017-01-29 2017-02-05 2020-10-12 2021-05-24. Author is listed
  3. NEP-EDU: Education (3) 2016-10-16 2017-06-04 2017-12-03. Author is listed
  4. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (2) 2021-01-11 2021-01-25
  5. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2017-01-29 2020-10-12
  6. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (1) 2017-06-04
  7. NEP-EFF: Efficiency & Productivity (1) 2017-12-03
  8. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2020-06-15
  9. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2020-06-15
  10. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2021-01-25
  11. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2021-01-25
  12. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2017-12-03

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