IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Distribution, aggregate demand and productivity growth: theory and empirical results for six OECD countries based on a post-Kaleckian model

  • Eckhard Hein
  • Artur Tarassow

Empirical research based on the Bhaduri/Marglin-variant of the Kaleckian model has recently shown that aggregate demand in many medium-sized and large open economies tends to be wage-led in the medium to long run, even in a period of increasing globalisation. In this paper we extend this type of analysis and integrate the effects on productivity growth, theoretically and empirically. Productivity growth is introduced into the theoretical model making use of the Verdoorn effect or of Kaldor's technical progress function and hence of a positive relationship between GDP or capital stock growth and productivity growth. Further on, a cost-push or Marx/Hicks-effect and hence a positive impact of real wage growth or the wage share on productivity growth is taken into account. In the empirical part we estimate productivity growth equations for six countries introducing these two effects. Finally, economic policy conclusions are drawn. Copyright The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Cambridge Political Economy Society. All rights reserved., Oxford University Press.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Cambridge Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 34 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 727-754

in new window

Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:34:y:2010:i:4:p:727-754
Contact details of provider: Postal: Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK
Fax: 01865 267 985
Web page:

Order Information: Web:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Amit Bhaduri, 2006. "Endogenous economic growth: a new approach," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(1), pages 69-83, January.
  2. Bhaduri, Amit & Marglin, Stephen, 1990. "Unemployment and the Real Wage: The Economic Basis for Contesting Political Ideologies," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(4), pages 375-93, December.
  3. Engelbert Stockhammer & Eckhard Hein & Lucas Grafl, 2007. "Globalization and the effects of changes in functional income distribution on aggregate demand in Germany," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp114, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
  4. Paul M. Romer, 1994. "The Origins of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 3-22, Winter.
  5. Gilberto Tadeu Lima, 2000. "Market concentration and technological innovation in a dynamic model of growth and distribution," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 53(215), pages 447-475.
  6. Eckhard Hein & Lena Vogel, 2009. "Distribution and Growth in France and Germany: Single Equation Estimations and Model Simulations Based on the Bhaduri/Marglin Model," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 245-272.
  7. Gilberto Tadeu Lima, 2004. "Endogenous Technological Innovation, Capital Accumulation And Distributional Dynamics," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 386-408, November.
  8. Blecker, Robert A, 1989. "International Competition, Income Distribution and Economic Growth," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(3), pages 395-412, September.
  9. Cornwall, John & Cornwall, Wendy, 2002. "A demand and supply analysis of productivity growth," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 203-229, June.
  10. Grossman, G.M. & Helpman, E., 1993. "Endogenous, Innovation in the Theory of Growth," Papers 165, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Public and International Affairs.
  11. Nelson H. Barbosa-Filho & Lance Taylor, 2006. "Distributive And Demand Cycles In The Us Economy-A Structuralist Goodwin Model," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(3), pages 389-411, 07.
  12. H. Sonmez Atesoglu & John Smithin, 2006. "Real wages, productivity and economic growth in the G7, 1960-2002," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(2), pages 223-233.
  13. Adalmir Marquetti, 2004. "Do Rising Real Wages Increase The Rate Of Labor-Saving Technical Change? Some Econometric Evidence," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 432-441, November.
  14. Engelbert Stockhammer & �zlem Onaran & Stefan Ederer, 2009. "Functional income distribution and aggregate demand in the Euro area," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(1), pages 139-159, January.
  15. Miguel A. León-Ledesma, 1999. "Accumulation, Innovation and Catching-Up: An Extended Cumulative Growth Model," Studies in Economics 9906, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  16. Elliott, Graham & Rothenberg, Thomas J & Stock, James H, 1996. "Efficient Tests for an Autoregressive Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(4), pages 813-36, July.
  17. Dutt, Amitava Krishna, 1987. "Alternative Closures Again: A Comment on 'Growth, Distribution and Inflation.'," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 75-82, March.
  18. Eckhard Hein & Lena Vogel, 2008. "Distribution and growth reconsidered: empirical results for six OECD countries," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(3), pages 479-511, May.
  19. Engelbert Stockhammer & Robert Stehrer, 2011. "Goodwin or Kalecki in Demand? Functional Income Distribution and Aggregate Demand in the Short Run," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 43(4), pages 506-522, December.
  20. Dutt, Amitava Krishna, 1984. "Stagnation, Income Distribution and Monopoly Power," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(1), pages 25-40, March.
  21. Stefan Ederer, 2008. "Competition-oriented Wage Policy and Its Effects on Aggregate Demand in the Netherlands," WIFO Working Papers 312, WIFO.
  22. Amitava Krishna Dutt, 2006. "Aggregate Demand, Aggregate Supply and Economic Growth," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 319-336.
  23. Engelbert Stockhammer & Stefan Ederer, 2008. "Demand effects of the falling wage share in Austria," Empirica, Springer, vol. 35(5), pages 481-502, December.
  24. C. W. M. Naastepad, 2006. "Technology, demand and distribution: a cumulative growth model with an application to the Dutch productivity growth slowdown," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(3), pages 403-434, May.
  25. Miguel A. León-Ledesma & A. P. Thirlwall, 1998. "The Endogeneity of the Natural Rate of Growth," Studies in Economics 9821, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  26. C. W.M. Naastepad & Servaas Storm, 2007. "OECD demand regimes (1960-2000)," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 29(2), pages 211-246, January.
  27. Mario Cassetti, 2003. "Bargaining power, effective demand and technical progress: a Kaleckian model of growth," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(3), pages 449-464, May.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:34:y:2010:i:4:p:727-754. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press)

or (Christopher F. Baum)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.