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Endogenous economic growth: a new approach

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  • Amit Bhaduri

Abstract

This new approach incorporates on the demand side the problem of effective demand and unemployment, while rejecting on the supply side the oversimplistic use of a production function, with or without capital--labour substitution. The focus on the adoption and diffusion of labour productivity growth permits viewing supply as being driven endogenously by inter-class conflict over distribution as well as inter-class conflict among rival firms over market shares. The result is a race between growth rates in labour productivity and in the real wage rate, which drives demand and productivity growth on the one hand, while making wage share reasonably constant on the other. The existence and stability properties of the steady state are also examined. Copyright 2006, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Amit Bhaduri, 2006. "Endogenous economic growth: a new approach," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(1), pages 69-83, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:30:y:2006:i:1:p:69-83
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cje/bei047
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    Cited by:

    1. Tavani, Daniele, 2012. "Wage bargaining and induced technical change in a linear economy: Model and application to the US (1963–2003)," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 117-126.
    2. Eckhard Hein & Achim Truger, 2011. "Fiscal Policy in the Macroeconomic Policy Mix: A Critique of the New Consensus Model and a Comparison of Macroeconomic Policies in France, Germany, the UK and Sweden from a Post-Keynesian Perspective," Chapters,in: Credit, Money and Macroeconomic Policy, chapter 12 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Asjad Naqvi & Engelbert Stockhammer, 2017. "Directed technological change in a post-Keynesian ecological macromodel," Working Papers PKWP1714, Post Keynesian Economics Study Group (PKSG).
    4. Eckhard Hein & Artur Tarassow, 2010. "Distribution, aggregate demand and productivity growth: theory and empirical results for six OECD countries based on a post-Kaleckian model," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(4), pages 727-754.
    5. Guschanski, Alexander & Onaran, Özlem, 2018. "The labour share and financialisation: Evidence from publicly listed firms," Greenwich Papers in Political Economy 19371, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre.
    6. Roberto Veneziani & Luca Zamparelli & Daniele Tavani & Luca Zamparelli, 2017. "Endogenous Technical Change In Alternative Theories Of Growth And Distribution," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(5), pages 1272-1303, December.
    7. Hiroaki Sasaki, 2013. "Cyclical growth in a Goodwin–Kalecki–Marx model," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 108(2), pages 145-171, March.
    8. Engelbert Stockhammer & Paul Ramskogler, 2009. "Wie weiter? Zur Zukunft des Postkeynesianismus," Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft - WuG, Kammer für Arbeiter und Angestellte für Wien, Abteilung Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Statistik, vol. 35(3), pages 329-353.
    9. Mitra Thakur, Gogol, 2013. "Policy-Induced Changes in Income Distribution and Profit-Led Growth in A Developing Economy," MPRA Paper 57779, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Steven Fazzari & Piero Ferri & AnnaMaria Variato, 2018. "Demand-led growth and accommodating supply," FMM Working Paper 15-2018, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    11. Hiroaki Sasaki & Ryunosuke Sonoda & Shinya Fujita, 2013. "International Competition and Distributive Class Conflict in an Open Economy Kaleckian Model," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 683-715, November.
    12. OHNO, Takashi, 2015. "Capital-Labor Conflict in the Harrodian model," CCES Discussion Paper Series 61, Center for Research on Contemporary Economic Systems, Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University.
    13. Hein, Eckhard, 2011. "Distribution, ‘Financialisation’ and the Financial and Economic Crisis – Implications for Post-crisis Economic Policies," MPRA Paper 31180, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Sasaki, Hiroaki, 2012. "Is the long-run equilibrium wage-led or profit-led? A Kaleckian approach," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 231-244.
    15. Onaran, Özlem & Guschanski, Alexander, 2018. "The causes of falling wage share: sectoral and firm level evidence from developed and developing countries – what have we learned?," Greenwich Papers in Political Economy 19373, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre.
    16. Eckhard Hein & Lena Vogel, 2009. "Distribution and Growth in France and Germany: Single Equation Estimations and Model Simulations Based on the Bhaduri/Marglin Model," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 245-272.
    17. Sasaki, Hiroaki, 2010. "Endogenous technological change, income distribution, and unemployment with inter-class conflict," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 123-134, May.
    18. Eckhard Hein & Lena Vogel, 2007. "Distribution and growth reconsidered - empirical results for Austria, France, Germany, the Netherlands, the UK and the USA," IMK Working Paper 03-2007, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    19. Guschanski, Alexander & Onaran, Özlem, 2017. "The political economy of income distribution: industry level evidence from 14 OECD countries," Greenwich Papers in Political Economy 17518, University of Greenwich, Greenwich Political Economy Research Centre.
    20. Eckhard Hein, 2012. "The Macroeconomics of Finance-Dominated Capitalism – and its Crisis," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14931.
    21. Hiroaki Sasaki, 2008. "Endogenous Technological Change and Distribution with Inter-Class Conflict: A Kaleckian Model of Growth," TERG Discussion Papers 237, Graduate School of Economics and Management, Tohoku University.
    22. Hein, Eckhard. & Mundt, Matthias., 2012. "Financialisation and the requirements and potentials for wage-led recovery : a review focussing on the G20," ILO Working Papers 994709323402676, International Labour Organization.

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