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Gender discrimination in education, health, and labour market: a voice for equality

Author

Listed:
  • Haroon Ur Rashid Khan

    (King Abdulaziz University)

  • Anwar Khan

    (Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia
    COMSATS Institute of Information Technology)

  • Khalid Zaman

    () (Abbottabad University of Science & Technology)

  • Agha Amad Nabi

    (Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, UTM)

  • Sanil S. Hishan

    (Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, UTM)

  • Talat Islam

    (University of the Punjab)

Abstract

Abstract The objective of the study is to examine the impact of gender discrimination in education, health, and labour market on economic growth in a panel of 20 high-income OECD countries for the period of 1980–2015. In addition, the study proposed an index of pro-equality growth, which is flared with education, health, and labour market initiatives to promote economic growth. The results show that gender parity index for educational attainment significantly promotes economic growth while health and labour market required substantial policy reforms to reduce health and labour market inequalities to sustain long-term economic growth. The results classified three countries as highly equitable growth, one country for equitable growth, two countries are moderate growth, four countries are less equitable growth while remaining 10 countries fall in the category of inequitable growth, where greater inequality promotes economic growth on the cost of education, health, and labour market inequalities.

Suggested Citation

  • Haroon Ur Rashid Khan & Anwar Khan & Khalid Zaman & Agha Amad Nabi & Sanil S. Hishan & Talat Islam, 2017. "Gender discrimination in education, health, and labour market: a voice for equality," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 51(5), pages 2245-2266, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:qualqt:v:51:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s11135-016-0384-4
    DOI: 10.1007/s11135-016-0384-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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