IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/jafrec/v23y2014isuppl_1pi18-i61..html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Gender, Development and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Stephanie Seguino
  • Maureen Were

Abstract

A plethora of scholars have attempted to discern the causes of slow growth in the sub-Saharan Africa region. The effects of global economic integration, corruption, geography and ethnic diversity have been widely explored. Mainstream growth analyses, however, have not yet integrated the body of scholarship that identifies the linkages between gender, economic development and growth. This paper explores the theoretical and empirical macro-growth effects of gender inequality in sub-Saharan Africa. It further identifies two key policy avenues for promoting gender equality and thus growth: public investment to reduce the gender gap in care burdens, and a shift in emphasis of central bank targets to employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephanie Seguino & Maureen Were, 2014. "Gender, Development and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 23(suppl_1), pages 18-61.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:23:y:2014:i:suppl_1:p:i18-i61.
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/jae/ejt024
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Michael L. Goodman & Beatrice J. Selwyn & Robert O. Morgan & Linda E. Lloyd & Moses Mwongera & Stanley Gitari & Philip H. Keiser, 2016. "Improved food quality, quantity and security among Kenyan orphans and vulnerable children: associations with participation in a multisectoral community-based program, age, gender, and sexual risk," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(2), pages 427-442, April.
    2. Christine Dieterich & Anni Huang & Alun H. Thomas, 2016. "Women’s Opportunities and Challenges in Sub-Saharan African Job Markets," IMF Working Papers 16/118, International Monetary Fund.
    3. repec:spr:qualqt:v:51:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s11135-016-0384-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Majid, H. & Siegmann, K.A., 2017. "Has growth been good for women’s employment in Pakistan?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 630, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    5. repec:bla:afrdev:v:29:y:2017:i:3:p:367-375 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:23:y:2014:i:suppl_1:p:i18-i61.. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/csaoxuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.