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Inequality and Growth: The Neglected Time Dimension

  • Halter, David
  • Oechslin, Manuel

The empirical literature on the relationship between inequality and growth offers a contradictory assessment: Estimators based on time-series (differences-based) variation indicate a strong positive link while estimators (also) exploiting the cross-sectional (levelbased) variation suggest a negative relationship. Using an expanded dataset, the present paper confirms this conflicting pattern — and reconciles it on the basis of a simple model. We argue that the differences-based methods are prone to reflect the mostly positive shortor medium-run implications of inequality while the level-based estimators also incorporate more negative long-term consequences. Thus, the latter estimates come close to reflecting the adverse overall impact of inequality in the long run.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 8033.

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Date of creation: Sep 2010
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8033
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