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Cross-Country Growth Regressions

Author

Listed:
  • Benhabib, Jess
  • Spiegel, Mark

Abstract

A large literature has identified a variety of "ancillary variables", such as political instability, income distribution, and financial development as important determinants of income growth in cross-sectional studies. This leaves open the question of whether these variables influence growth through their effect on rates of factor accumulation or their influence on total factor productivity growth. This paper addressses this question by examining whether "primitives", or rates of factor accumulation, are sufficient statistics for economic growth, and whether the ancillary variables found in the literature do enter in the determination of physical and human capital accumulation rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark, 1997. "Cross-Country Growth Regressions," Working Papers 97-20, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  • Handle: RePEc:cvs:starer:97-20
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    Cited by:

    1. Majid Sameti & Shekoofeh Farahmand & Keihan Koleyni & Roya Aghaeifar, 2013. "Comparing the ANN and Linear Regression in Estimation of the Growth Model (The Case of MENA)," Iranian Economic Review, Economics faculty of Tehran university, vol. 18(1), pages 69-91, winter.
    2. Alejandro Gaytan & Romain Rancière, 2004. "Wealth, financial intermediation and growth," Economics Working Papers 851, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Apr 2004.
    3. Bardhan, Pranab & Bowles, Samuel & Gintis, Herbert, 2000. "Wealth inequality, wealth constraints and economic performance," Handbook of Income Distribution,in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 10, pages 541-603 Elsevier.
    4. Ozan Hatipoglu, 2007. "A Demand Based Theory of Income Distribution and Growth," Working Papers 2007/08, Bogazici University, Department of Economics.
    5. Sen, Swapan & Kasibhatla, Krishna M. & Stewart, David B., 2007. "Debt overhang and economic growth-the Asian and the Latin American experiences," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 3-11, March.
    6. Stephen Bond & Anke Hoeffler, 2001. "GMM Estimation of Empirical Growth Models," Economics Series Working Papers 2001-W21, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    7. Ziv Chinzara & Radhika Lahiri, 2012. "Financial Intermediation and Costly Technology Adoption under Uncertainty: A Political Economy Perspective," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 295, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    8. Ronaldo A. Arraes & Vladimir Kühl Teles, 2003. "Differences in Long Run Growth Path Between Latin American and Developed Countries: Empirical Evidences," Anais do XXXI Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 31st Brazilian Economics Meeting] c10, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    9. Yasmina Reem Limam & Stephen M. Miller, 2004. "Explaining Economic Growth: Factor Accumulation, Total Factor Productivity Growth, and Production Efficiency Improvement," Working papers 2004-20, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    10. Guido Cozzi & Fabio Privileggi, 2009. "The fractal nature of inequality in a fast growing world: new version," Working Papers 2009_30, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
    11. Ikonen, Pasi, 2010. "Effect of finance on growth through more efficient utilization of technological innovations," Research Discussion Papers 21/2010, Bank of Finland.
    12. Guido Cozzi & Fabio Privileggi, 2007. "The Fractal Nature of Inequality in a Fast Growing World," Working Papers 2007_45, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
    13. Durlauf, Steven N. & Quah, Danny T., 1999. "The new empirics of economic growth," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 235-308 Elsevier.
    14. Stephen Bond & Anke Hoeffler & Jonathan Temple, 2001. "GMM Estimation of Empirical Growth Models," Economics Papers 2001-W21, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    15. Halter, David & Oechslin, Manuel, 2010. "Inequality and Growth: The Neglected Time Dimension," CEPR Discussion Papers 8033, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    16. Gregory Brock, 2010. "Growth in Russia's federal districts, 1994-2003," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 19-31.
    17. Andrés Solimano & Arístides Torche, 2008. "Income Distribution In Chile, 1987-2006: Analysis And Policy Considerations," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 480, Central Bank of Chile.
    18. Ben Jelili, Riadh & Abdmoulah, Walid, 2013. "Access to Finance Thresholds and the Finance-Growth Nexus," MPRA Paper 52221, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2012.
    19. Banerjee, Abhijit V & Duflo, Esther, 2003. "Inequality and Growth: What Can the Data Say?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 267-299, September.
    20. Guido Cozzi & Fabio Privileggi, 2002. "Wealth Polarization and Pulverization in Fractal Societies," ICER Working Papers - Applied Mathematics Series 39-2002, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ECONOMIC GROWTH ; HUMAN CAPITAL ; MACROECONOMICS ; LABOUR ; DEMOGRAPHY ; EDUCATION ; INCOME DISTRIBUTION;

    JEL classification:

    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • N30 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - General, International, or Comparative

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