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Gender inequality and growth: the case of rich vs. poor countries

Author

Listed:
  • Amin, Mohammad
  • Kuntchev, Veselin
  • Schmidt, Martin

Abstract

This paper uses cross-section data for 107 countries to explore the relationship between gender inequality and economic growth. The paper departs from the literature by using a broad measure of gender inequality that goes well beyond gender inequality in education, which has been the focus of most studies. Another novelty of the paper lies in exploring heterogeneity in the growth-gender inequality relationship. The results confirm that greater gender inequality is strongly associated with lower economic growth. However, this negative relationship between gender inequality and growth is entirely due to the relatively poor countries, with the relatively rich countries showing no such relationship. The findings have important implications for the design and targeting of gender-specific policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Amin, Mohammad & Kuntchev, Veselin & Schmidt, Martin, 2015. "Gender inequality and growth: the case of rich vs. poor countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7172, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7172
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Alesina, Alberto & Devleeschauwer, Arnaud & Easterly, William & Kurlat, Sergio & Wacziarg, Romain, 2003. "Fractionalization," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 155-194, June.
    4. Robert J. Barro, 2013. "Inflation and Economic Growth," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(1), pages 121-144, May.
    5. Mikael Lindahl & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Education for Growth: Why and for Whom?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1101-1136, December.
    6. MacKellar, Landis & Woergoetter, Andreas & Woerz, Julia, 2000. "Economic Development Problems of Landlocked Countries," Transition Economics Series 14, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    7. Stephen Knack & Philip Keefer, 1997. "Does Social Capital Have an Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1251-1288.
    8. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
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    10. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong-Wha, 1994. "Sources of economic growth," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 1-46, June.
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    13. Bluedorn, John C., 2001. "Can democracy help? Growth and ethnic divisions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 121-126, January.
    14. Janet Gale Stotsky, 2006. "Gender and its Relevance to Macroeconomic Policy; A Survey," IMF Working Papers 06/233, International Monetary Fund.
    15. Stephanie Seguino & Maria Sagrario Floro, 2003. "Does Gender have any Effect on Aggregate Saving? An empirical analysis," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 147-166.
    16. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Quels liens entre inégalités de genre et croissance ?
      by ? in D'un champ l'autre on 2015-01-24 23:25:00

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Özlem Onaran & Cem Oyvat & Eurydice Fotopoulou, 2019. "The effects of gender inequality, wages, wealth concentration and fiscal policy on macroeconomic performance," FMM Working Paper 50-2019, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    2. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2018. "A Theory of Social Norms, Women's Time Allocation, and Gender Inequality in the Process of Development," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 237, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender and Development; Achieving Shared Growth; Inequality; Gender and Law; Economic Theory&Research;

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