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Gender Differentials in Unemployment Ins and Outs during the Great Recession in Spain

Author

Listed:
  • Sara Rica

    (University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU)
    FEDEA)

  • Yolanda F. Rebollo-Sanz

    () (University Pablo Olavide)

Abstract

Abstract The Great Recession had led to gender convergence in unemployment rates. In this paper we seek its sources to assess whether this convergence will remain once the Great Recession ends. We use Social Security records to study the determinants of unemployment ins and outs for men and women separately, over the course of a whole business cycle, i.e. 2000–2013. We focus on Spain—a country hit hard by unemployment increases in downturns. We find that unemployment outs are crucial in understanding changes in unemployment rates in Spain as well as to understand the gender convergence in unemployment rates. Among the determinants of the large drop in unemployment outs, lack of demand and negative state dependence emerge as key sources, which affect men more negatively than women. In a scenario of upcoming recovery, unemployment outs will increase for short-term unemployed, particularly for males. On the contrary, both male and female long-term unemployed workers will face enormous difficulties to access a job, as the job access rates for long-term unemployed is not sensitive to the economic cycle. Hence, we expect that the gender convergence in unemployment rates will persist only when considering the long-term unemployed.

Suggested Citation

  • Sara Rica & Yolanda F. Rebollo-Sanz, 2017. "Gender Differentials in Unemployment Ins and Outs during the Great Recession in Spain," De Economist, Springer, vol. 165(1), pages 67-99, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:decono:v:165:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10645-016-9288-x
    DOI: 10.1007/s10645-016-9288-x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kenneth A. Couch & Robert W. Fairlie & Huanan Xu, 2016. "Racial Differences in Labor Market Transitions and the Great Recession," CESifo Working Paper Series 5772, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Sara de la Rica & Lucía Gorjón, 2016. "The impact of family-friendly policies in Spain and their use throughout the business cycle," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-26, December.
    3. repec:bla:labour:v:31:y:2017:i:4:p:337-368 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:spr:jlabre:v:38:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s12122-017-9244-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:kap:empiri:v:45:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10663-016-9356-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. NAGORE GARCIA Amparo & VAN SOEST Arthur, 2016. "Unemployment Exits Before and During the Crisis," LISER Working Paper Series 2016-14, LISER.
    7. NAGORE GARCIA Amparo, 2017. "Gender Differences in Unemployment Dynamics and Initial Wages over the Business Cycle," LISER Working Paper Series 2017-06, LISER.
    8. repec:eme:ijmpps:ijm-04-2016-0082 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:taf:irapec:v:31:y:2017:i:2:p:173-190 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Max Coveney & Pilar Garcia Gomez & Eddy Van Doorslaer & Tom Van Ourti, 2015. "Health Disparities by Income in Spain before and after the Economic Crisis," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-130/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    11. Yolanda F. Rebollo-Sanz, 2017. "Decomposing the structure of wages into firm and worker effects: Some insights from a high unemployment economy," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(5), pages 765-787, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Unemployment gross flows; Hazard rates; Gender differentials; Oaxaca decomposition;

    JEL classification:

    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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