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The Cyclicality of the Separation and Job Finding Rates in France

  • Jean-Olivier Hairault

    ()

    (PSE)

  • Thomas Le Barbanchon

    ()

    (CREST)

  • Thepthida Sopraseuth

    ()

    (Université de Cergy)

In this paper, we aim to shed light on the relative contribution of the separation and job finding rates to French unemployment at business cycle frequencies by using administrative data on registered unemployment and labor force surveys. We first investigate the fluctuations in steady state unemployment, and then in current unemployment in order to take into account the unemployment deviations from equilibrium. Our results show the dominant role of the job finding rate in accounting for French unemployment fluctuations. The contribution of the job finding rate amounts to about two-thirds of the unemployment dynamics. With the two data sets, we find that both rates contributed to unemployment fluctuations during the nineties, while the job finding rate has been more significant in the last decade. In particular, the last business cycle episodes, including the last recession, exacerbate the role of the job finding rate

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Paper provided by Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique in its series Working Papers with number 2012-22.

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Length: 28
Date of creation: Jun 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:crs:wpaper:2012-22
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  1. Gary Solon & Ryan Michaels & Michael W. L. Elsby, 2009. "The Ins and Outs of Cyclical Unemployment," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 84-110, January.
  2. Gayle Allard, 2005. "Measuring job security over time: in search of a historical indicator for EPL," Working Papers Economia wp05-17, Instituto de Empresa, Area of Economic Environment.
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  4. José I. Silva & Javier Vázquez-Grenno, 2012. "The ins and outs of unemployment in a two-tier labor market," Working Papers 2012/17, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  5. Petrongolo, Barbara & Pissarides, Christopher, 2008. "The Ins and Outs of European Unemployment," CEPR Discussion Papers 6681, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  7. Anna Manzoni & Ruud Luijkx & Ruud Muffels, 2011. "Explaining differences in labour market transitions between panel and life-course data in West-Germany," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 241-261, February.
  8. Fabio Canova & David Lopez-Salido & Claudio Michelacci, 2009. "The ins and outs of unemployment: An analysis conditional on technology shocks," Economics Working Papers 1213, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jan 2012.
  9. Shigeru Fujita & Garey Ramey, 2007. "The cyclicality of separation and job finding rates," Working Papers 07-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  10. George A. Akerlof & Janet L. Yellen, 1985. "Unemployment Through the Filter of Memory," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(3), pages 747-773.
  11. Gillian Paull, 2002. "Biases in the reporting of labour market dynamics," IFS Working Papers W02/10, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  12. Ch. Pissarides., 2011. "The Unemployment Volatility Puzzle: Is Wage Stickiness the Answer?," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 1.
  13. Thierry Magnac & Michael Visser, 1999. "Transition Models With Measurement Errors," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(3), pages 466-474, August.
  14. Jennifer C. Smith, 2011. "The Ins and Outs of UK Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(552), pages 402-444, 05.
  15. Cahuc, Pierre & Charlot, Olivier & Malherbet, Franck, 2012. "Explaining the Spread of Temporary Jobs and its Impact on Labor Turnover," IZA Discussion Papers 6365, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  16. Tomi Kyyrä & Ralf Wilke, 2014. "On the reliability of retrospective unemployment information in European household panel data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(4), pages 1473-1493, June.
  17. Pedro Portugal & Olivier Blanchard, 2001. "What Hides Behind an Unemployment Rate: Comparing Portuguese and U.S. Labor Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 187-207, March.
  18. Gomes, Pedro Maia, 2010. "Labour Market Flows: Facts from the United Kingdom," IZA Discussion Papers 5327, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  19. repec:inr:wpaper:156514 is not listed on IDEAS
  20. Poterba, James M & Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. "Reporting Errors and Labor Market Dynamics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(6), pages 1319-38, November.
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