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Job-finding and separation rates in the OECD

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  • Hobijn, Bart
  • Sahin, Aysegül

Abstract

We provide a set of comparable estimates of average monthly job-finding and separation rates for over 20 OECD countries that can be used for the cross-country analysis of labor markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Hobijn, Bart & Sahin, Aysegül, 2009. "Job-finding and separation rates in the OECD," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 104(3), pages 107-111, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:104:y:2009:i:3:p:107-111
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Labor markets Worker flows;

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