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Unemployment, cycle and gender

Author

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  • Peiró, Amado
  • Belaire-Franch, Jorge
  • Gonzalo, Maria Teresa

Abstract

This study analyzes the relationship between unemployment and the business cycle in the UK and the US. For both economies, a strong and definite association is found that shows that cyclical shocks extend their effect on unemployment over several quarters. This association is much more intense for male unemployment than for female unemployment, although some strength has been lost in the UK in the last few years.

Suggested Citation

  • Peiró, Amado & Belaire-Franch, Jorge & Gonzalo, Maria Teresa, 2012. "Unemployment, cycle and gender," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 1167-1175.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:34:y:2012:i:4:p:1167-1175
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmacro.2012.06.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ghazala Azmat & Maia Güell & Alan Manning, 2006. "Gender Gaps in Unemployment Rates in OECD Countries," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(1), pages 1-38, January.
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    3. Gary Solon & Robert Barsky & Jonathan A. Parker, 1994. "Measuring the Cyclicality of Real Wages: How Important is Composition Bias?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(1), pages 1-25.
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    5. Pissarides, Christopher, 2003. "Unemployment in Britain: a European success story," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2304, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Blundell, Richard & Macurdy, Thomas, 1999. "Labor supply: A review of alternative approaches," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 27, pages 1559-1695 Elsevier.
    7. Bradley T. Ewing & William Levernier & Farooq Malik, 2002. "The Differential Effects of Output Shocks on Unemployment Rates by Race and Gender," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 68(3), pages 584-599, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Razzu, Giovanni & Singleton, Carl, 2016. "Gender and the business cycle: An analysis of labour markets in the US and UK," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 47(PB), pages 131-146.
    2. Dimitrios Bakas & Evangelia Papapetrou, 2014. "Unemployment by Gender: Evidence from EU Countries," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 20(1), pages 103-111, February.
    3. repec:bla:manchs:v:85:y:2017:i:4:p:466-490 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2014. "Gender and the Business Cycle: A Stocks and Flows Analysis of US and UK Labour Market States," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2014-10, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    5. repec:kap:iaecre:v:20:y:2014:i:1:p:103-111 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Amaia Altuzarra, 2015. "Measuring Unemployment Persistence by Age and Gender," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 110-133, December.
    7. Jorge Belaire-Franch & Amado Peiró, 2015. "Asymmetry in the relationship between unemployment and the business cycle," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 683-697, March.
    8. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2013. "Are Business Cycles Gender Neutral?," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2013-07, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    9. Brincikova Zuzana & Darmo Lubomir, 2015. "The Impact of Economic Growth on Gender Specific Unemployment in the EU," Scientific Annals of Economics and Business, De Gruyter Open, vol. 62(3), pages 383-390, November.
    10. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2016. "Segregation and Gender Gaps through the UK’s Great Recession," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2015-02, Henley Business School, Reading University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Business cycle; Gender; Unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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