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Man-cessions, fiscal policy, and the gender composition of employment

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  • Bredemeier, Christian
  • Juessen, Falko
  • Winkler, Roland

Abstract

Recessions are man-cessions, as men are disproportionately exposed to cyclical employment fluctuations. We provide evidence that fiscal expansions stimulate predominantly female employment implying a further destabilization of the gender composition of employment in recessions. Our findings can be understood as a consequence of differences in the industry–occupation mix of employment by gender.

Suggested Citation

  • Bredemeier, Christian & Juessen, Falko & Winkler, Roland, 2017. "Man-cessions, fiscal policy, and the gender composition of employment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 73-76.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:158:y:2017:i:c:p:73-76
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2017.06.022
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:26:p:2545-2562 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Christian Bredemeier & Roland Winkler, 2017. "The employment dynamics of different population groups over the business cycle," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(26), pages 2545-2562, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal policy; Composition of employment; Gender; Industries; Occupations;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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