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Modelling the business cycle of a small open economy: The Reserve Bank of New Zealand's DSGE model

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  • Kamber, Gunes
  • McDonald, Chris
  • Sander, Nick
  • Theodoridis, Konstantinos

Abstract

We describe the underlying structure of the new forecast and policy model used at the Reserve Bank of New Zealand and evaluate its ability to explain New Zealand data. Unlike other estimated small-open-economy DSGE models, we find that more than one third of the domestic GDP growth is driven by foreign shocks. The elevated contribution of foreign shocks to the domestic economy is driven by our decision to exclude mapping export demand to data on world GDP. Estimating our model without any foreign demand data limits the response of exports to the real exchange variations. This feature makes exports and, consequently, domestic GDP much more sensitive to variations to foreign demand and raises the importance of foreign shocks to the domestic business cycle. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that a model with “adaptive” expectations is preferred by the data relative to the version of the model with “rational” expectations. In that case, the model explains nominal variables using on average much smaller shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Kamber, Gunes & McDonald, Chris & Sander, Nick & Theodoridis, Konstantinos, 2016. "Modelling the business cycle of a small open economy: The Reserve Bank of New Zealand's DSGE model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 546-569.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:59:y:2016:i:c:p:546-569
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2016.08.013
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    Cited by:

    1. Morrisy, Stephen D., 2017. "Efficient estimation of macroeconomic equations with unobservable states," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 408-423.
    2. Neroli Austin & Geordie Reid, 2017. "NZSIM: A model of the New Zealand economy for forecasting and policy analysis," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 80, pages 1-14, January.
    3. Georgiadis, Georgios & Jancokova, Martina, 2017. "Financial Globalisation, Monetary Policy Spillovers and Macro-modelling: Tales from 1001 Shocks," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 314, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    4. repec:bla:ausecr:v:50:y:2017:i:1:p:103-106 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Chris McDonald, 2017. "Does past inflation predict the future?," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2017/04, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    DSGE models; Open economy; Monetary policy; Business cycle;

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E47 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General

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