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The international transmission of volatility shocks: an empirical analysis

  • Mumtaz, Haroon

    ()

    (Bank of England)

  • Theodoridis, Konstantinos

    ()

    (Reserve Bank of New Zealand)

This paper proposes an empirical model which can be used to estimate the impact of changes in the volatility of shocks to US real activity on the UK economy. The proposed empirical model is a structural VAR where the volatility of structural shocks is time varying and is allowed to affect the level of endogenous variables. Using this extended SVAR model we estimate that a one standard deviation increase in the volatility of the shock to US real GDP leads to a decline in UK GDP growth of 0.1% and a 0.1% increase in UK CPI inflation. We then use a non-linear small open economy New Keynesian business cycle model calibrated to US/UK economies to investigate what kind of stochastic volatility shocks can deliver such behaviour. We find that shocks that generate marginal cost uncertainty – such as foreign wage mark-up and productivity stochastic volatility shocks – can reproduce the macroeconomic aggregate responses obtained by the empirical model. An increase in uncertainty, associated with foreign demand shocks on the other hand has a negligible impact on the domestic economy.

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Paper provided by Bank of England in its series Bank of England working papers with number 463.

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Length: 67 pages
Date of creation: 07 Oct 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:0463
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  1. Alejandro Justiniano & Bruce Preston, 2010. "Monetary policy and uncertainty in an empirical small open-economy model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 93-128.
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  12. Koop, Gary & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Potter, Simon M., 1996. "Impulse response analysis in nonlinear multivariate models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 119-147, September.
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  15. Almuth Scholl & Harald Uhlig, 2006. "New Evidence on the Puzzles: Monetary Policy and Exchange Rates," Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 5, Society for Computational Economics.
  16. Mumtaz, Haroon & Sunder-Plassmann, Laura, 2010. "Time-varying dynamics of the real exchange rate. A structural VAR analysis," Bank of England working papers 382, Bank of England.
  17. Harrison, Richard & Oomen, Özlem, 2010. "Evaluating and estimating a DSGE model for the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 380, Bank of England.
  18. Łukasz Kwiatkowski, 2010. "Markov Switching In-Mean Effect. Bayesian Analysis in Stochastic Volatility Framework," Central European Journal of Economic Modelling and Econometrics, CEJEME, vol. 2(1), pages 59-94, January.
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