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Unemployment and Domestic Violence: Theory and Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Anderberg, Dan

    () (Royal Holloway, University of London)

  • Rainer, Helmut

    () (Ifo Institute for Economic Research)

  • Wadsworth, Jonathan

    () (Royal Holloway, University of London)

  • Wilson, Tanya

    () (University of Glasgow)

Abstract

Is unemployment the overwhelming determinant of domestic violence that many commentators expect it to be? The contribution of this paper is to examine, theoretically and empirically, how changes in unemployment affect the incidence of domestic abuse. The key theoretical prediction is that male and female unemployment have opposite-signed effects on domestic abuse: an increase in male unemployment decreases the incidence of intimate partner violence, while an increase in female unemployment increases domestic abuse. Combining data on intimate partner violence from the British Crime Survey with locally disaggregated labor market data from the UK's Annual Population Survey, we find strong evidence in support of the theoretical prediction.

Suggested Citation

  • Anderberg, Dan & Rainer, Helmut & Wadsworth, Jonathan & Wilson, Tanya, 2013. "Unemployment and Domestic Violence: Theory and Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 7515, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7515
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ana Tur-Prats, 2017. "Unemployment and intimate-partner violence: A gender-identity approach," Working Papers 963, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    2. Bhalotra, Sonia R. & Kambhampati, Uma & Rawlings, Samantha & Siddique, Zahra, 2018. "Intimate Partner Violence and the Business Cycle," IZA Discussion Papers 11274, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Vincent Leyaro & Pablo Selaya & Neda Trifkovic, 2017. "Fishermen’s wives: On the cultural origins of violence against women," WIDER Working Paper Series 205, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Dan Brown & Elisabetta De Cao, 2017. "The Impact of Unemployment on Child Maltreatment in the United States," Working Papers 106, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    5. Sofia Amaral & Sonia Bhalotra & Nishith Prakash, 2019. "Gender, Crime and Punishment: Evidence from Women Police Stations in India," Boston University - Department of Economics - The Institute for Economic Development Working Papers Series dp-309, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    6. Berthelon, Matias & Contreras, Dante & Kruger, Diana & Palma, María Isidora, 2018. "Violence during Early Childhood and Child Development," IZA Discussion Papers 11984, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner & Jesse Matheson & Reka Plugor, 2019. "Understanding Access Barriers to Public Services: Lessons from a Randomized Domestic Violence Intervention," Working Papers 2019013, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    8. Eleonora Guarnieri & Helmut Rainer, 2018. "Female Empowerment and Male Backlash," CESifo Working Paper Series 7009, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. repec:ces:ifobei:79 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. De Cao, Elisabetta & McCormick, Barry & Nicodemo, Catia, 2019. "Does Unemployment Worsen Babies' Health? A Tale of Siblings, Maternal Behaviour and Selection," IZA Discussion Papers 12568, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Dan Anderberg & Noemi Mantovan & Robert Sauer, 2018. "The dynamics of domestic violence: learning about the match," IFS Working Papers W18/12, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    12. repec:spr:jopoec:v:32:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s00148-018-0696-x is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Sarah Khan & Stephan Klasen, 2018. "Female employment and Spousal abuse: A parallel cross-country analysis of 35 developing countries," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 249, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    14. Olivier Bargain & Laurine Martinoty, 2019. "Crisis at home: mancession-induced change in intrahousehold distribution," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 32(1), pages 277-308, January.
    15. Siddique, Zahra, 2018. "Violence and Female Labor Supply," IZA Discussion Papers 11874, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    16. Gorinas, Cédric, 2018. "A Detailed Analysis of Childhood Victimization Using National Registers: Forms and Sequencing of Violence and Domestic Abuse," IZA Discussion Papers 11398, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. repec:eee:ecolet:v:178:y:2019:i:c:p:77-81 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Elisabetta De Cao, 2017. "The Impact of Unemployment on Child Maltreatment in the United States," Economics Series Working Papers 837, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    domestic violence; unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • D19 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Other

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