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How Did the Great Recession Affect Different Types of Workers? Evidence from 17 Middle-Income Countries

  • Cho, Yoonyoung
  • Newhouse, David

This paper examines how different types of workers in middle-income countries fared during the immediate aftermath of the great recession. Youth suffered extraordinary increases in unemployment and declines in wage employment. Employment to population ratios also plummeted for men, primarily due to their higher initial employment rates. Percentage employment declines within sector were gender-neutral, and there is little indication of strong added worker effects. Traditionally disadvantaged groups such as less educated and female workers were not necessarily most affected during the crisis, underscoring the importance of implementing targeted mitigation measures that focus on displaced youth and wage employees.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 41 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 31-50

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:41:y:2013:i:c:p:31-50
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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  1. Leung, Ron & Stampini, Marco & Vencatachellum, Désiré, 2009. "Does Human Capital Protect Workers against Exogenous Shocks? South Africa in the 2008-2009 Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 4608, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Khanna, Gaurav & Newhouse, David & Paci, Pierella, 2010. "Fewer Jobs or Smaller Paychecks? Labor Market Impacts of the Recent Crisis in Middle-Income Countries," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 11, pages 1-4, April.
  3. Bell, David & Blanchflower, David, 2010. "Youth Unemployment: Deja Vu?," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2010-04, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  4. Sabarwal, Shwetlena & Sinha, Nistha & Buvinic, Mayra, 2011. "How Do Women Weather Economic Shocks? What We Know," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 46, pages 1-6, January.
  5. McKenzie, David J, 2004. "Aggregate Shocks and Urban Labor Market Responses: Evidence from Argentina's Financial Crisis," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(4), pages 719-58, July.
  6. Richard B. Freeman, 2005. "Labour Market Institutions Without Blinders: The Debate over Flexibility and Labour Market Performance," NBER Working Papers 11286, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Bart Hobijn & Aysegul Sahin & Michael Elsby, 2010. "The Labor Market in the Great Recession," 2010 Meeting Papers 323, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  8. Emmanuel Skoufias & Susan Parker, 2006. "Job loss and family adjustments in work and schooling during the Mexican peso crisis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 163-181, February.
  9. Peter R. Fallon & Robert E. B. Lucas, 2002. "The Impact of Financial Crises on Labor Markets, Household Incomes, and Poverty: A Review of Evidence," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 17(1), pages 21-45.
  10. Bilal Barakat & Johannes Holler & Klaus Prettner & Julia Schuster, 2010. "The Impact of the Economic Crisis on Labour and Education in Europe," Working Papers 1006, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna.
  11. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-46, September.
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