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Sanctioned to Death? The Impact of Economic Sanctions on Life Expectancy and its Gender Gap

Author

Listed:
  • Jerg Gutmann
  • Matthias Neuenkirch
  • Florian Neumeier

Abstract

We empirically analyze the effect of UN and US economic sanctions on life expectancy and its gender gap in target countries. Our sample covers 98 less developed and newly industrialized countries over the period 1977–2012. We employ a matching approach to account for the endogeneity of sanctions. Our results indicate that an average epi-sode of UN sanctions reduces life expectancy by about 1.2–1.4 years. The correspond-ing decrease of 0.4–0.5 years under an average episode of US sanctions is significantly smaller. In addition, we find evidence that women are affected more severely by the imposition of sanctions. Sanctions not being “gender-blind” can be interpreted as evi-dence that they disproportionately affect (the life expectancy of) the more vulnerable members of society. We also detect some effect heterogeneity, as the reduction in life expectancy accumulates over time. Furthermore, countries with a better political envi-ronment are less severely affected by economic sanctions.

Suggested Citation

  • Jerg Gutmann & Matthias Neuenkirch & Florian Neumeier, 2017. "Sanctioned to Death? The Impact of Economic Sanctions on Life Expectancy and its Gender Gap," Research Papers in Economics 2017-06, University of Trier, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:trr:wpaper:201706
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender Gap; Human Development; Life Expectancy; Sanctions; United Nations; United States;

    JEL classification:

    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions
    • F52 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - National Security; Economic Nationalism
    • F53 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development

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