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The added worker effect over the business cycle: evidence from urban Mexico


  • Susan Parker
  • Emmanuel Skoufias


This paper investigates whether the added worker effect is an important determinant of the increased labour force participation by women and whether the magnitude of the added worker effect differs between the peak and trough of the business cycle. Use is made of repeated observations from spouses in urban Mexico, collected during the Peso crisis (1994:4-1995:4) and during the period of economic prosperity (1998:4-1999:4). Significant added worker effects are found in both periods. The magnitude of the added worker effect during the crisis period is found to be twice as large as that observed during the period of economic prosperity.

Suggested Citation

  • Susan Parker & Emmanuel Skoufias, 2004. "The added worker effect over the business cycle: evidence from urban Mexico," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(10), pages 625-630.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:11:y:2004:i:10:p:625-630 DOI: 10.1080/1350485042000235693

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Cullen, Julie Berry & Gruber, Jonathan, 2000. "Does Unemployment Insurance Crowd Out Spousal Labor Supply?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(3), pages 546-572, July.
    2. Emmanuel Skoufias & Susan Parker, 2006. "Job loss and family adjustments in work and schooling during the Mexican peso crisis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(1), pages 163-181, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Julio Guzman, 2014. "Social Protection and Private Coping Strategies During Recessions: Evidence from Chile," Working Papers wp_041, Adolfo Ibáñez University, School of Government.
    2. Tamar Khitarishvili, 2013. "The Economic Crisis of 2008 and the Added Worker Effect in Transition Countries," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_765, Levy Economics Institute.
    3. Kathryn Graddy & Jonathan Hamilton, 2014. "Auction House Guarantees for Works of Art," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-02-2014, Association for Cultural Economics International, revised May 2014.
    4. Huang, Fung-Mey & Luh, Yir-Hueih & Huang, Fung-Yea, 2012. "Unemployment information and wives’ labor supply responses to husbands’ job loss in Taiwan," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 1176-1194.
    5. Giannakopoulos, Nicholas, 2015. "The added worker effect of married women in Greece during the Great Depression," MPRA Paper 66298, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2012-66 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Lina Cardona-Sosa & Luz Adriana Flórez & Leonardo Morales Zurita, 2016. "Intra-household labour supply after an unemployment event: The added worker effect," Borradores de Economia 944, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    8. Bredtmann, Julia & Otten, Sebastian & Rulff, Christian, 2014. "Husband's Unemployment and Wife's Labor Supply – The Added Worker Effect across Europe," Ruhr Economic Papers 484, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    9. Umaña-Aponte, Marcela & Bhalotra, Sonia R., 2012. "Women's Labour Supply and Household Insurance in Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 066, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    10. Nidhiya Menon & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers, 2010. "War and Women’s Work: Evidence from the Conflict in Nepal," Working Papers 19, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
    11. Jaime Lara, 2016. "Remittances as an Insurance Mechanism in the Labor Market," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 368-387, September.
    12. Sabarwal, Shwetlena & Sinha, Nistha & Buvinic, Mayra, 2011. "How Do Women Weather Economic Shocks? What We Know," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 46, pages 1-6, January.
    13. Merle Kreibaum & Stephan Klasen, 2015. "Missing Men: Differential Effects of War and Socialism on Female Labour Force Participation in Vietnam," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 181, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    14. Nidhiya Menon & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers, 2010. "Impact of the 2008-2009 Food, Fuel, and Financial Crisis On the Philippine Labor Market," Working Papers 17, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
    15. repec:zbw:rwirep:0484 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Emmanuel Skoufias & Mauricio Santa María & Laura A. Ripani, 2007. "Cyclical Variations in Participation and Employment in Urban Labor Markets: the Case of Colombia and Mexico," COYUNTURA SOCIAL 012868, FEDESARROLLO.
    17. Sonia Bhalotra & Marcela Umaña-Aponte, 2010. "The Dynamics of Women’s Labour Supply in Developing Countries," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/235, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    18. Lee, Grace H.Y. & Parasnis, Jaai, 2014. "Discouraged workers in developed countries and added workers in developing countries? Unemployment rate and labour force participation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 90-98.
    19. Sabarwal, Shwetlena & Sinha, Nistha & Buvinic, Mayra, 2010. "How do women weather economic shocks ? a review of the evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5496, The World Bank.

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