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The public–private sector wage differential in the UK: Evidence from longitudinal employer–employee data

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  • Singleton, Carl

Abstract

If fiscal policy exerts pressure on public services, then attention often falls on the public–private sector wage differential. Estimated with longitudinal employer–employee data for the years 2002–2016 in the United Kingdom, among men there was no significant public sector wage premium. However, women received an average 4% premium compared with working in private sector firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Singleton, Carl, 2019. "The public–private sector wage differential in the UK: Evidence from longitudinal employer–employee data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 174(C), pages 109-113.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:174:y:2019:i:c:p:109-113
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2018.11.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Card & Ana Rute Cardoso & Joerg Heining & Patrick Kline, 2018. "Firms and Labor Market Inequality: Evidence and Some Theory," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(S1), pages 13-70.
    2. David Card & Jörg Heining & Patrick Kline, 2013. "Workplace Heterogeneity and the Rise of West German Wage Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(3), pages 967-1015.
    3. John M. Abowd & Robert H. Creecy & Francis Kramarz, 2002. "Computing Person and Firm Effects Using Linked Longitudinal Employer-Employee Data," Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Technical Papers 2002-06, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    4. Haskel, Jonathan & Szymanski, Stefan, 1993. "Privatization, Liberalization, Wages and Employment: Theory and Evidence for the UK," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 60(238), pages 161-181, May.
    5. Stephen Nickell & Glenda Quintini, 2002. "The Consequences of The Decline in Public Sector Pay in Britain: A Little Bit of Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(477), pages 107-118, February.
    6. Monojit Chatterji & Karen Mumford & Peter Smith, 2011. "The public-private sector gender wage differential in Britain: evidence from matched employee-workplace data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(26), pages 3819-3833.
    7. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & David N. Margolis, 1999. "High Wage Workers and High Wage Firms," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(2), pages 251-334, March.
    8. Pedro Gomes, 2015. "Optimal Public Sector Wages," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(587), pages 1425-1451, September.
    9. Richard Disney & Amanda Gosling, 1998. "Does it pay to work in the public sector?," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 19(4), pages 347-374, November.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Public sector premium; Firm-specific wages; Gender;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets

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