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The Formation of Risk Sharing Networks


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Cited by:

  1. Jaramillo, Fernando & Kempf, Hubert & Moizeau, Fabien, 2015. "Heterogeneity and the formation of risk-sharing coalitions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 79-96.
  2. Muange, Elijah Nzula & Schwarze, Stefan & Qaim, Matin, 2014. "Social networks and farmer exposure to improved cereal varieties in central Tanzania," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182645, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  3. Margherita Comola & Marcel Fafchamps, 2010. "Are gifts and loans between households voluntary?," CSAE Working Paper Series 2010-20, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  4. Bluffstone, Randall & Yesuf, Mahmud & Bushie, Bilisuma & Damite, Demessie, 2008. "Rural Livelihoods, Poverty, and the Millennium Development Goals: Evidence from Ethiopian Survey Data," Discussion Papers dp-08-07-efd, Resources For the Future.
  5. Joshua Evan Blumenstock & Nathan Eagle & Marcel Fafchamps, 2011. "Risk and Reciprocity Over the Mobile Phone Network: Evidence from Rwanda," Working Papers 11-25, NET Institute, revised Sep 2011.
  6. Todd Cherry & E. Lance Howe & James J. Murphy, 2012. "Sharing as Risk Pooling in a Social Dilemma Experiment," Working Papers 2012-01, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
  7. Belhaj, Mohamed & Deroïan, Frédéric, 2012. "Risk taking under heterogenous revenue sharing," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 192-202.
  8. Aida, Takeshi, 2015. "Spatial vs. Social Network Effects in Risk Sharing," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 210937, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  9. Margherita Comola & Marcel Fafchamps, 2014. "Testing Unilateral and Bilateral Link Formation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(579), pages 954-976, September.
  10. Sommarat Chantarat & Christopher Barrett, 2012. "Social network capital, economic mobility and poverty traps," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 10(3), pages 299-342, September.
  11. Jenny C. Aker, 2010. "Information from Markets Near and Far: Mobile Phones and Agricultural Markets in Niger," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 46-59, July.
  12. Brown, Philip H. & Bulte, Erwin & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2011. "Positional spending and status seeking in rural China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 139-149, September.
  13. Selim Gulesci, 2012. "Labor-tying and poverty in a rural economy:evidence from bangladesh," Working Papers 460, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  14. Chen, Xi, 2011. "Anatomy of Stigmatized Behavior: Peer Influence and Relative Concern," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103644, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  15. Bruno Wichmann & Minjie Chen & Wiktor Adamowicz, 2016. "Social Networks and Choice Set Formation in Discrete Choice Models," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-26, October.
  16. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 2010. "Who cares about relative deprivation?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 171-185, February.
  17. HOSHINO Tadao & SHIMAMOTO Daichi & TODO Yasuyuki, 2017. "Accounting for Heterogeneity in Network Formation Behavior: An application to Vietnamese SMEs," Discussion papers 17023, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  18. Nordman, Christophe J. & Pasquier-Doumer, Laure, 2015. "Transitions in a West African labour market: The role of family networks," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 74-85.
  19. Bet Caeyers & Stefan Dercon, 2012. "Political Connections and Social Networks in Targeted Transfer Programs: Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60(4), pages 639 - 675.
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