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COVID-19 and Children's School Resilience: Evidence from Nigeria

Author

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  • Dessy, Sylvain
  • Gninafon, Horace
  • Tiberti, Luca
  • Tiberti, Marco

Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of COVID-19 lockdown measures on children's school resilience. Using an individual fixed-effect linear probability model on Nigeria data, it exploits the quasi-randomness of these measures to estimate their effect on school attendance after the lockdown was lifted. The results show that COVID-19 lockdown measures reduced children's probability of attending school after the school system reopened. This negative impact increased with children's age, reaching a peak among those whose education was no longer compulsory. For schoolchildren in that age group, the negative effect of COVID-19 lockdown measures is likely to be permanent, which, if not reversed, will undermine the quality of the economy-wide future labor force. The paper also finds evidence that, in the child marriageprone North-West part of Nigeria, these measures increased gender inequality in education among children aged 12 to 18. This result suggests that COVID-19 lockdown measures may exacerbate harmful traditional practices such as child marriage.

Suggested Citation

  • Dessy, Sylvain & Gninafon, Horace & Tiberti, Luca & Tiberti, Marco, 2021. "COVID-19 and Children's School Resilience: Evidence from Nigeria," GLO Discussion Paper Series 952, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:952
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    1. Kidman, Rachel & Breton, Etienne & Behrman, Jere & Kohler, Hans-Peter, 2022. "Returning to school after COVID-19 closures: Who is missing in Malawi?," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    COVID-19's lockdown measures; School attendance; Schools' disruptions; Gender inequality in education; Nigeria;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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