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Information Networks among Women and Men and the Demand for an Agricultural Technology in India

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  • Magnan, Nicholas
  • Spielman, David J.
  • Gulati, Kajal
  • Lybbert, Travis

Abstract

Although there is ample evidence of differences in how and where men and women acquire information, most research on learning household decision-making only considers access to information for a single, typically male, household head. This assumption is problematic in developing-country agriculture, where women play a fundamental role in farming. Using gender-disaggregated social network data from Uttar Pradesh, India, we analyze agricultural information networks among men and women.We test for gender-specific network effects on demand for laser land leveling—a resource-conserving technology—using data from a field experiment that combines a BDM auction with a lottery. We find that factors determining male and female links are similar, although there is little overlap between male and female networks. We also find evidence of female network effects on household technology demand, although male network effects are clearly stronger. Results indicate that extension services can better leverage female networks to promote new technologies.

Suggested Citation

  • Magnan, Nicholas & Spielman, David J. & Gulati, Kajal & Lybbert, Travis, 2015. "Information Networks among Women and Men and the Demand for an Agricultural Technology in India," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212209, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:212209
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.212209
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Khushbu Mishra & Abdoul G. Sam & Gracious M. Diiro & Mario J. Miranda, 2020. "Gender and the dynamics of technology adoption: Empirical evidence from a household‐level panel data," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 51(6), pages 857-870, November.
    3. Natcher, David & Bachmann, Erika & Pittman, Jeremy & Kulshreshtha, Suren & Baco, Mohamed Nasser & Akponikpe, P. B. I. & Peak, Derek, 2016. "Knowledge Diffusion and the Adoption of Fertilizer Microdosing in Northwest Benin," Sustainable Agriculture Research, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 5(3).
    4. Raghunathan, K., 2018. "Women's self-help groups, decision-making, and improved agricultural practices in India," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277537, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Leuveld, Koen & Nillesen, Eleonora & Pieters, Janneke & Ross, Martha & Voors, Maarten & Wang Sonne, Elise, 2018. "Agricultural extension and input subsidies to reduce food insecurity. Evidence from a field experiment in the Congo," MERIT Working Papers 2018-009, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    6. Sudha Narayanan & Sharada Srinivasan, 2020. "No country for young women farmers: A situation analysis for India," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2020-041, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    7. Anna Folke Larsen, 2015. "The network at work: Diffusion of banana cultivation in Tanzania," CAM Working Papers camwp2015_01, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
    8. Murphy, David M. A., 2017. "Underground Knowledge: Soil Testing, Farmer Learning, and Input Demand in Kenya," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258372, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Govil, Richa & Rana, Garima, 2017. "Demand for Agricultural Information among Women Farmers: A Survey from Karnataka, India," Review of Agrarian Studies, Foundation for Agrarian Studies, vol. 7(1), July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

    JEL classification:

    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services

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