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Transitions in a West African Labour Market: The Role of Family Networks

Author

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  • Christophe Jalil Nordman

    (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - Université Paris Dauphine-PSL - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Laure Pasquier-Doumer

    (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - Université Paris Dauphine-PSL - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

This paper sheds light on the role of family networks in the dynamics of a West African labour market, i.e. in the transitions from unemployment to employment, from wage employment to self-employment, and from self-employment to wage employment. It investigates the effects of three dimensions of family networks on these transitions: their structure, the strength of their ties, and the resources embedded in them. For this purpose, we use a first-hand survey conducted in Ouagadougou on a representative sample of 2000 households. Using event history data and very detailed information on family networks, we estimate proportional hazard models for discrete-time data. We find that family networks have a significant effect on the dynamics of workers in the labour market and that this effect differs depending on the type of transition and the dimension of the family network considered. Network size appears not to matter much in labour market dynamics. However, strong ties play a stabilizing role by limiting large transitions. Their negative effect on transitions is reinforced by a high level of resources embedded in the network.

Suggested Citation

  • Christophe Jalil Nordman & Laure Pasquier-Doumer, 2015. "Transitions in a West African Labour Market: The Role of Family Networks," Post-Print hal-01619727, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01619727
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2014.11.008
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.science/hal-01619727
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    8. Jean-Philippe Berrou & François Combarnous, 2018. "Beyond Solidarity and Accumulation Networks in Urban Informal African Economies," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 30(4), pages 652-675, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Family network; Labour market dynamics; Event history data; Survival analysis; Burkina Faso;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation

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