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Citations of

Pawel Zabczyk

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Bianca De Paoli & Pawel Zabczyk, 2013. "Cyclical Risk Aversion, Precautionary Saving, and Monetary Policy," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(1), pages 1-36, 02.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Risk Aversion and the Natural Interest Rate
      by Blog Author in Liberty Street Economics on 2014-07-16 11:00:00
    2. 'Risk Aversion and the Natural Interest Rate'
      by Mark Thoma in Economist's View on 2014-07-16 08:21:30
    3. Should Monetary Policy Respond to Financial Conditions?
      by Blog Author in Liberty Street Economics on 2015-11-16 12:00:00
  2. De Paoli, Bianca & Zabczyk, Pawel, 2012. "Why Do Risk Premia Vary Over Time? A Theoretical Investigation Under Habit Formation," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(S2), pages 252-266, September.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Should Monetary Policy Respond to Financial Conditions?
      by Blog Author in Liberty Street Economics on 2015-11-16 12:00:00

Working papers

  1. Roger Farmer & Pawel Zabczyk, 2016. "The Theory of Unconventional Monetary Policy," Discussion Papers 1611, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).

    Cited by:

    1. Farmer, Roger E A, 2016. "Pricing Assets in an Economy with Two Types of People," CEPR Discussion Papers 11253, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Jens H. E. Christensen & Signe Krogstrup, 2016. "A Portfolio Model of Quantitative Easing," Working Paper Series WP16-7, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    3. Sameer Khatiwada, 2017. "Quantitative Easing by the Fed and International Capital Flows," IHEID Working Papers 02-2017, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.

  2. Andreasen, Martin & Ferman, Marcelo & Zabczyk, Pawel, 2012. "The business cycle implications of banks’ maturity transformation," Bank of England working papers 446, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. Holmberg, Ulf, 2012. "The Credit Market and the Determinants of Credit Crunches: An Agent Based Modeling Approach," Umeå Economic Studies 836, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    2. Smith, Anthony Jr. & Wang, Cheng, 2006. "Dynamic credit relationships in general equilibrium," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(4), pages 847-877, May.
    3. Danilo Liberati, 2014. "An estimated DSGE model with search and matching frictions in the credit market," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 986, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    4. Martin Andreasen & Marcelo Ferman & Pawel Zabczyk, 2013. "The Business Cycle Implications of Banks' Maturity Transformation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(4), pages 581-600, October.
    5. Pau Rabanal & Dominic Quint, 2017. "Should Unconventional Monetary Policies Become Conventional?," 2017 Meeting Papers 526, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Punnoose Jacob & Anella Munro, 2016. "A macroprudential stable funding requirement and monetary policy in a small open economy," CAMA Working Papers 2016-23, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    7. Alessandri, Piergiorgio & Nelson, Benjamin, 2012. "Simple banking: profitability and the yield curve," Bank of England working papers 452, Bank of England.
    8. Matteo Iacoviello, 2010. "Financial Business Cycles," 2010 Meeting Papers 1053, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Kühl, Michael, 2014. "The financial accelerator and market-based debt instruments: A role for maturities?," Discussion Papers 08/2014, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
    10. Moises S. Andrade & Tiago Berriel, 2016. "Is There an Output Free Lunch for Fiscal Inationary Policies?," Textos para discussão 650, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).

  3. Andreasen , Martin & Zabczyk, Pawel, 2011. "An efficient method of computing higher-order bond price perturbation approximations," Bank of England working papers 416, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. Andreasen, Martin M., 2012. "An estimated DSGE model: Explaining variation in nominal term premia, real term premia, and inflation risk premia," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(8), pages 1656-1674.
    2. Andreasen, Martin, 2011. "An estimated DSGE model: explaining variation in term premia," Bank of England working papers 441, Bank of England.
    3. Grzegorz Wesołowski, 2016. "Do long term interest rates drive GDP and inflation in small open economies? Evidence from Poland," NBP Working Papers 242, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    4. Fernández-Villaverde, Jesús & Koijen, Ralph & Rubio-Ramírez, Juan Francisco & van Binsbergen, Jules H., 2010. "The Term Structure of Interest Rates in a DSGE Model with Recursive Preferences," CEPR Discussion Papers 7781, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  4. De Paoli, Bianca & Zabczyk, Pawel, 2011. "Cyclical risk aversion, precautionary saving and monetary policy," Bank of England working papers 418, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. John H. Cochrane, 2016. "The Habit Habit," Economics Working Papers 16105, Hoover Institution, Stanford University.
    2. Bonciani, Dario, 2014. "Uncertainty shocks: it's a matter of habit," MPRA Paper 59370, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Łukasz Rawdanowicz & Romain Bouis & Kei-Ichiro Inaba & Ane Kathrine Christensen, 2014. "Secular Stagnation: Evidence and Implications for Economic Policy," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1169, OECD Publishing.
    4. Martin Seneca, 2017. "Risk Shocks Close to the Zero Lower Bound," 2017 Meeting Papers 107, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Michael Hatcher, 2013. "The inflation risk premium on government debt in an overlapping generations model," Working Papers 2013_17, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
    6. James D. Hamilton & Ethan S. Harris & Jan Hatzius & Kenneth D. West, 2016. "The Equilibrium Real Funds Rate: Past, Present, and Future," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 64(4), pages 660-707, November.
    7. Bingbing Dong, 2014. "Asset Pricing and Monetary Policy," 2014 Meeting Papers 881, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Hatcher, Michael, 2011. "Time-varying volatility, precautionary saving and monetary policy," Bank of England working papers 440, Bank of England.
    9. John H. Cochrane, 2017. "Macro-Finance," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 21(3), pages 945-985.
    10. Seneca, Martin, 2016. "Risk shocks close to the zero lower bound," Bank of England working papers 606, Bank of England.
    11. Andersson, Magnus & D’Agostino, Antonello & de Bondt, Gabe & Roma, Moreno, 2011. "The predictive content of sectoral stock prices: a US-euro area comparison," Working Paper Series 1343, European Central Bank.

  5. Mumtaz, Haroon & Zabczyk, Pawel & Ellis, Colin, 2011. "What lies beneath? A time-varying FAVAR model for the UK transmission mechanism," Working Paper Series 1320, European Central Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Hilde C. Bjørnland & Leif Anders Thorsrud, 2015. "Commodity prices and fiscal policy design: Procyclical despite a rule," Working Papers No 5/2015, Centre for Applied Macro- and Petroleum economics (CAMP), BI Norwegian Business School.
    2. Lo Duca, Marco & Adam, Tomáš, 2017. "Modeling euro area bond yields using a time-varying factor model," Working Paper Series 2012, European Central Bank.
    3. David Aikman & Oliver Bush & Alan M. Taylor, 2016. "Monetary versus macroprudential policies:causal impacts of interest rates andcredit controls in the era of the UKradcliffe report," Economic History Working Papers 67035, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    4. Leif Anders Thorsrud, 2016. "Words are the new numbers: A newsy coincident index of business cycles," Working Papers No 4/2016, Centre for Applied Macro- and Petroleum economics (CAMP), BI Norwegian Business School.
    5. Belke, Ansgar & Osowski, Thomas, 2017. "International effects of euro area versus US policy uncertainty: A FAVAR approach," Ruhr Economic Papers 689, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Georgiadis, Georgios & Jancokova, Martina, 2017. "Financial Globalisation, Monetary Policy Spillovers and Macro-modelling: Tales from 1001 Shocks," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 314, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    7. Francesco Zanetti & Wei Li, 2016. "The Effect of Monetary Policy Shocks in the United Kingdom: an External Instruments Approach," Economics Series Working Papers 812, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    8. Kemal Bagzibagli, 2012. "Monetary Transmission Mechanism and Time Variation in the Euro Area," Discussion Papers 12-12, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    9. Garreth Rule, 2015. "Understanding the central bank balance sheet," Handbooks, Centre for Central Banking Studies, Bank of England, edition 1, number 32.
    10. Leif Anders Thorsrud, 2016. "Nowcasting using news topics. Big Data versus big bank," Working Paper 2016/20, Norges Bank.
    11. Goodness C. Aye & Mehmet Balcilar & Rangan Gupta, 2016. "The Effectiveness of Monetary Policy in South Africa under Inflation Targeting: Evidence from a Time-Varying Factor-Augmented Vector Autoregressive Model," Working Papers 201653, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    12. Stefano Neri & Tiziano Ropele, 2015. "The macroeconomic effects of the sovereign debt crisis in the euro area," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1007, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    13. Cloyne, James & Hürtgen, Patrick, 2014. "The macroeconomic effects of monetary policy: a new measure for the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 493, Bank of England.
    14. Borzykh, Olga, 2016. "Bank lending channel in Russia: A TVP-FAVAR approach," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 43, pages 96-117.
    15. Forbes, Kristin & Hjortsoe, Ida & Nenova, Tsvetelina, 2015. "The shocks matter: improving our estimates of exchange rate pass-through," Discussion Papers 43, Monetary Policy Committee Unit, Bank of England.
    16. Anastasios Evgenidis & Costas Siriopoulos, 2015. "What are the International Channels Through Which a US Policy Shock is Transmitted to The World Economies? Evidence from a Time Varying FAVAR," Working Papers 190, Bank of Greece.
    17. Ambrogio Cesa-Bianchi & Gregory Thwaites & Alejandro Vicondoa, 2016. "Monetary Policy Transmission in an Open Economy: New Data and Evidence from the United Kingdom," Discussion Papers 1612, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM), revised Aug 2016.
    18. Bijsterbosch, Martin & Falagiarda, Matteo, 2015. "The macroeconomic impact of financial fragmentation in the euro area: Which role for credit supply?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 93-115.
    19. Amir-Ahmadi, Pooyan & Matthes, Christian & Wang, Mu-Chun, 2016. "Choosing Prior Hyperparameters," Working Paper 16-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    20. Forbes, Kristin & Hjortsoe, Ida & Nenova, Tsvetelina, 2017. "Shocks versus structure: explaining differences in exchange rate pass-through across countries and time," Discussion Papers 50, Monetary Policy Committee Unit, Bank of England.

  6. Haberis, Alex & Markovic, Bojan & Mayhew, Karen & Zabczyk, Pawel, 2011. "Global rebalancing: the macroeconomic impact on the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 421, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. Igor Fedotenkov & Lex Meijdam, 2013. "Crisis and Pension System Design in the EU: International Spillover Effects Via Factor Mobility and Trade," De Economist, Springer, vol. 161(2), pages 175-197, June.
    2. Fedotenkov, I., 2012. "Pensions and ageing in a globalizing world. International spillover effects via trade and factor mobility," Other publications TiSEM 8830bc21-4138-4479-8459-a, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.

  7. De Paoli, Bianca & Zabczyk, Pawel, 2009. "Why do risk premia vary over time? A theoretical investigation under habit formation," Bank of England working papers 361, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. John Fry, 2014. "Bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies," The European Physical Journal B: Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, Springer;EDP Sciences, vol. 87(1), pages 1-13, January.
    2. Miranda-Agrippino, Silvia, 2016. "Unsurprising shocks: information, premia, and the monetary transmission," Bank of England working papers 626, Bank of England.
    3. Bianca De Paoli & Pawel Zabczyk, 2012. "Cyclical Risk Aversion, Precautionary Saving and Monetary Policy," CEP Discussion Papers dp1132, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Hatcher, Michael, 2011. "Time-varying volatility, precautionary saving and monetary policy," Bank of England working papers 440, Bank of England.
    5. De Paoli, Bianca & Sondergaard, Jens, 2009. "Foreign exchange rate risk in a small open economy," Bank of England working papers 365, Bank of England.

  8. Mumtaz, Haroon & Zabczyk, Pawel & Ellis, Colin, 2009. "What lies beneath: what can disaggregated data tell us about the behaviour of prices?," Bank of England working papers 364, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. Chong, Terence Tai Leung & Zhu, Tingting & Rafiq, M.S., 2013. "Are Prices Sticky in Large Developing Economies? An Empirical Comparison of China and India," MPRA Paper 60985, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Fuhrer, Jeffrey C., 2010. "Inflation Persistence," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 9, pages 423-486 Elsevier.
    3. Philip Bunn & Colin Ellis, 2012. "How do Individual UK Producer Prices Behave?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(558), pages 16-34, 02.
    4. Imran Hussain Shah & Simón Sosvilla-Rivero, 2017. "Seeking price and macroeconomic stabilisation in the euro area: The role of house prices and stock prices," IREA Working Papers 201710, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised May 2017.
    5. Kaufmann, Daniel & Lein, Sarah M., 2013. "Sticky prices or rational inattention – What can we learn from sectoral price data?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 384-394.
    6. Dixon, Huw & Franklin, Jeremy & Millard, Stephen, 2014. "Sectoral shocks and monetary policy in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 499, Bank of England.
    7. Adolfson, Malin & Lindé, Jesper, 2011. "Parameter Identification in a Estimated New Keynesian Open Economy Model," Working Paper Series 251, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    8. Ellis, Colin, 2009. "Do supermarket prices change from week to week?," Bank of England working papers 378, Bank of England.
    9. Philip Bunn & Colin Ellis, 2012. "Examining The Behaviour Of Individual UK Consumer Prices," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(558), pages 35-55, 02.

  9. Morten Spange & Pawel Zabczyk, 2006. "Sterling implications of a US current account reversal," Bank of England working papers 296, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. Blake, Andrew P & Markovic, Bojan, 2008. "The conduct of global monetary policy and domestic stability," Bank of England working papers 353, Bank of England.
    2. Bojan Markovic & Laura Povoledo, 2011. "Does Asias choice of exchange rate regime affect Europes exposure to US shocks?," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 16(2), pages 1-38, September.
    3. Karen Dury & Özlem Oomen, 2007. "The real exchange rate and quality improvements," Bank of England working papers 320, Bank of England.

Articles

  1. Andreasen Martin M. & Zabczyk Pawel, 2015. "Efficient bond price approximations in non-linear equilibrium-based term structure models," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 19(1), pages 1-33, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Lorenzo Bretscher & Alex Hsu & Andrea Tamoni, 2017. "Level and Volatility Shocks to Fiscal Policy: Term Structure Implications," 2017 Meeting Papers 258, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Martin M. Andreasen & Anders Kronborg, 2803. "The Extended Perturbation Method: New Insights on the New Keynesian Model," CREATES Research Papers 2017-14, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.

  2. Colin Ellis & Haroon Mumtaz & Pawel Zabczyk, 2014. "What Lies Beneath? A Time‐varying FAVAR Model for the UK Transmission Mechanism," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(576), pages 668-699, 05.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Bianca De Paoli & Pawel Zabczyk, 2013. "Cyclical Risk Aversion, Precautionary Saving, and Monetary Policy," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(1), pages 1-36, 02.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Martin Andreasen & Marcelo Ferman & Pawel Zabczyk, 2013. "The Business Cycle Implications of Banks' Maturity Transformation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(4), pages 581-600, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. De Paoli, Bianca & Zabczyk, Pawel, 2012. "Why Do Risk Premia Vary Over Time? A Theoretical Investigation Under Habit Formation," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(S2), pages 252-266, September. See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Bianca De Paoli & Pawel Zabczyk, 2012. "Cyclical precautionary saving and monetary policy," Research Bulletin, European Central Bank, vol. 16, pages 7-9.

    Cited by:

    1. Bingbing Dong, 2014. "Asset Pricing and Monetary Policy," 2014 Meeting Papers 881, Society for Economic Dynamics.

Software components

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