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Managing Macroeconomic Fluctuations with Flexible Exchange Rate Targeting

Author

Listed:
  • Jonas Heipertz
  • Ilian Mihov
  • Ana Maria Santacreu

Abstract

We show that a monetary policy rule that uses the exchange rate to stabilize the economy outperforms a Taylor rule in managing macroeconomics fluctuations and in achieving higher welfare. The differences between the rules are driven by: (i) the path of the nominal exchange rate and interest rate under each rule, and (ii) time variation in the risk premium, which leads to deviations from uncovered interest parity. These differences are larger in very open economies, more exposed to foreign shocks, and in which domestic and foreign goods are highly substitutable.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonas Heipertz & Ilian Mihov & Ana Maria Santacreu, 2017. "Managing Macroeconomic Fluctuations with Flexible Exchange Rate Targeting," Working Papers 2017-28, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 05 Nov 2019.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2017-028
    DOI: 10.20955/wp.2017.028
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. van Binsbergen, Jules H. & Fernández-Villaverde, Jesús & Koijen, Ralph S.J. & Rubio-Ramírez, Juan, 2012. "The term structure of interest rates in a DSGE model with recursive preferences," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(7), pages 634-648.
    2. Fernando Alvarez & Andrew Atkeson & Patrick J. Kehoe, 2008. "If exchange rates are random walks, then almost everything we say about monetary policy is wrong," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Jul, pages 2-9.
    3. John Y. Campbell & John Cochrane, 1999. "Force of Habit: A Consumption-Based Explanation of Aggregate Stock Market Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(2), pages 205-251, April.
    4. Adrien Verdelhan, 2010. "A Habit‐Based Explanation of the Exchange Rate Risk Premium," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 65(1), pages 123-146, February.
    5. Svensson, Lars E. O., 2000. "Open-economy inflation targeting," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 155-183, February.
    6. De Paoli, Bianca & Sondergaard, Jens, 2009. "Foreign exchange rate risk in a small open economy," Bank of England working papers 365, Bank of England.
    7. Jermann, Urban J., 1998. "Asset pricing in production economies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 257-275, April.
    8. Menzie D. Chinn & Saad Quayyum, 2012. "Long Horizon Uncovered Interest Parity Re-Assessed," NBER Working Papers 18482, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Eric Parrado, 2004. "Singapore's Unique Monetary Policy; How Does it Work?," IMF Working Papers 04/10, International Monetary Fund.
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Two papers on exchange rate policy
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2017-12-14 23:34:59

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Time-Varying Risk Premium; Exchange Rate Management; Welfare; Monetary Policy Rules;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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