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An intermediation-based model of exchange rates

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  • Semyon Malamud
  • Andreas Schrimpf

Abstract

We develop a general equilibrium model with intermediaries at the heart of international financial markets. In our model, intermediaries bargain with their customers and extract rents for providing access to foreign claims. The behavior of intermediaries, by tilting state prices, generates an explicit, non-linear risk structure in exchange rates. We show how this endogenous risk structure helps explain a number of anomalies in foreign exchange and international capital markets, including the safe haven properties of exchange rates and the breakdown of covered interest parity.

Suggested Citation

  • Semyon Malamud & Andreas Schrimpf, 2018. "An intermediation-based model of exchange rates," BIS Working Papers 743, Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:biswps:743
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    Cited by:

    1. Stefan Reitz & Dennis Umlandt, 2019. "Foreign Exchange Dealer Asset Pricing," Working Paper Series 2019-08, University of Trier, Research Group Quantitative Finance and Risk Analysis.
    2. Jonathan Kearns & Andreas Schrimpf & Dora Xia, 2018. "Explaining Monetary Spillovers: The Matrix Reloaded," BIS Working Papers 757, Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Jiang, Zhengyang, 2021. "US Fiscal cycle and the dollar," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 91-106.
    4. Reitz, Stefan & Umlandt, Dennis, 2021. "Currency returns and FX dealer balance sheets," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial intermediation; exchange rates; safe haven; covered interest parity deviations;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors

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