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Should Unconventional Monetary Policies Become Conventional?

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  • Quint, Dominic
  • Rabanal, Pau

Abstract

After the recent crisis, central banks deployed unconventional monetary policies (UMP) to affect credit conditions and to provide liquidity at a large scale. We study if UMP should still be used when economic conditions normalize. Using an estimated non-linear DSGE model with a banking sector and long-term debt for the US, we show that the benefits of using UMP in normal times are substantial. However, the benefits are shock-dependent and mostly arise when the economy is hit by financial shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Quint, Dominic & Rabanal, Pau, 2017. "Should Unconventional Monetary Policies Become Conventional?," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168218, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc17:168218
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. David Zeke & Robert Kurtzman, 2017. "Misallocation Costs of Digging Deeper into the Central Bank Toolkit," 2017 Meeting Papers 1347, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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