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A large central bank balance sheet? floor vs corridor systems in a new keynesian environment

Author

Listed:
  • Óscar Arce

    () (Banco de España)

  • Galo Nuño

    () (Banco de España)

  • Dominik Thaler

    () (Banco de España)

  • Carlos Thomas

    () (Banco de España)

Abstract

The quantitative easing (QE) policies implemented in recent years by central banks have had a profound impact on the working of money markets, giving rise to large excess reserves and pushing down key interbank rates against their floor – the interest rate on reserves. With macroeconomic fundamentals improving, central banks now face the dilemma as to whether to maintain this large balance sheet/floor system, or else to reduce their balance sheet size towards pre-crisis trends and operate traditional corridor systems. We address this issue using a New Keynesian model featuring heterogeneous banks that trade funds in an interbank market characterized by matching frictions. In this environment, balance sheet expansions push market rates towards their floor by slackening the interbank market. A large balance sheet regime is found to deliver ampler “policy space” by widening the steady-state distance between the interest on reserves and its effective lower bound (ELB). Nonetheless, a lean-balance-sheet regime that resorts to temporary but prompt QE in response to recessions severe enough for the ELB to bind achieves similar stabilization and welfare outcomes as a large-balance-sheet regime in which interest-rate policy is the primary adjustment margin thanks to the larger policy space.

Suggested Citation

  • Óscar Arce & Galo Nuño & Dominik Thaler & Carlos Thomas, 2018. "A large central bank balance sheet? floor vs corridor systems in a new keynesian environment," Working Papers 1851, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
  • Handle: RePEc:bde:wpaper:1851
    as

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    File URL: https://www.bde.es/f/webbde/SES/Secciones/Publicaciones/PublicacionesSeriadas/DocumentosTrabajo/18/Files/dt1851e.pdf
    File Function: First version, December 2018
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    central bank balance sheet; interbank market; search and matching frictions; reserves; zero lower bound;

    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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